Supererogate

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • v. i Supererogate To do more than duty requires; to perform works of supererogation; to atone (for a dificiency in another) by means of a surplus action or quality. "The fervency of one man in prayer can not supererogate for the coldness of another."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • supererogate To do more than duty requires; make up for some deficiency by extraordinary exertion.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. supererogatus, p. p. of supererogare, to spend or pay out over and above; super, over, above + erogare, to expend or pay out money from the public treasury after asking the consent of the people. See Super-, and Erogate Rogation

Usage

In literature:

She had accumulated religious force enough to do an act of supererogation.
"A Pair of Blue Eyes" by Thomas Hardy
Self-sacrifice is an act of supererogation.
"What is Property?" by P. J. Proudhon
So many weary lectures had to be attended, could not be "cut," that we abstained from lectures of supererogation, so to speak.
"Adventures among Books" by Andrew Lang
The idea of it has never occurred to us, simply because of its supererogation.
"The Works of Edgar Allan Poe Volume 2 (of 5) of the Raven Edition" by Edgar Allan Poe
For a long time it induced me to neglect their real improvement, as if this were a work of supererogation.
"Mauprat" by George Sand
To deprive a fool of his head seems a work of supererogation.
"Bardelys the Magnificent" by Rafael Sabatini
His marriage, according to this, was a pure work of supererogation.
"The Story of Pocahantas" by Charles Dudley Warner
For all his works of supererogation, his life was a life of pomp and luxury, compared to the proper saint's life.
"The Cardinal's Snuff-Box" by Henry Harland
Would to God that our labor of love could be regarded as a work of supererogation!
"The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus" by American Anti-Slavery Society
And think of that poor girl living with this human work of supererogation!
"The Purple Heights" by Marie Conway Oemler
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