Stound

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Stound A brief space of time; a moment.
    • Stound A sudden, severe pain or grief; peril; alarm.
    • n Stound A vessel for holding small beer.
    • Stound Astonishment; amazement.
    • Stound Hour; time; season.
    • a Stound stound Stunned.
    • v. i Stound stound To be in pain or sorrow.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n stound A time: a short time; a while; a moment; an instant.
    • stound To ache; smart.
    • stound To long; pine: as, the cows stound for grass.
    • n stound Sorrow; grief; longing.
    • stound To stun as with strokes; beat heavily: as, to stound the ears with the strokes of a bell.
    • stound To astound; amaze.
    • n stound A stunning blow or stroke; the force of a blow.
    • n stound Astonishment; amazement; bewilderment.
    • n stound An obsolete past participle of stun.
    • n stound A vessel to contain small beer.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Stound stownd (Spens.) a stunning influence, a blow, amazement: a shooting pain: a noise: sorrow, grief, mishap: effort
    • v.t Stound to stun, astound
    • n Stound stownd (Spens.) a moment of time: time, season, hour.
    • Stound stownd (Spens.) Same as Stunned.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
AS. stund,; akin to D. stond, G. stunde, Icel. stund,

Usage

In literature:

Suddenly there was a shock and stound all over the vessel, her progress was stopped, and a rocking vibration was felt everywhere.
"A Dark Night's Work" by Elizabeth Gaskell
THE BITTER BALEFULL STOUND, the bitter, grievous moment during which she listens to the story.
"Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book I" by Edmund Spenser
He is my Mistris page at euerie stound, And soone will tent a deepe intrenched wound.
"The Choise of Valentines" by Thomas Nash
Just after I was put to my prenticeship, having made free choice of the tailoring trade, I had a terrible stound of calf-love.
"The Life of Mansie Wauch Tailor in Dalkeith, written by himself" by David Macbeth Moir
Just after I was put to my prenticeship, having made free choice of the tailoring trade, I had a terrible stound of calf-love.
"The Life of Mansie Wauch tailor in Dalkeith" by D. M. Moir
Ye have me made whole and sound, Therefore I will abide with thee in every stound.
"Fifteenth Century Prose and Verse" by Various
Just after I was put to my apprenticeship, having made free choice of the tailoring trade, I had a terrible stound of calf-love.
"Amusing Prose Chap Books" by Various
But the Grahams, lady, will grip to their foe when the death-stound's in their fingers.
"Discipline" by Mary Brunton
In what place they shall be found, I shall you tell in what stound.
"A Book about Doctors" by John Cordy Jeaffreson
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In poetry:

As a man that wauks frae a stound
And kens but a single thocht,
Oot o' the wind and the nicht
I got the peace that I socht.
""On Leave"" by John Buchan
"What boot wilt thou have?" our king replied;
"Now tell me in this stound."--
"No pence, nor halfpence, by my fay,
But a noble in gold so round."--
"King Edward IV. And The Tanner Of Tamworth" by Henry Morley
"What boot wilt thou have?" the tanner replied,
"Now tell me in this stound."--
"No pence nor halfpence, sir, by my fay,
But I will have twenty pound."--
"King Edward IV. And The Tanner Of Tamworth" by Henry Morley
Were is that lawhing and that song,
That trayling and that proude gong,
Tho havekes and tho houndes?
Al that joye is went away,
That wele is comen to weylaway,
To manye harde stoundes.
"Ubi Sunt Qui Ante Nos Fuerunt?" by Anonymous Americas