Stola

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Stola (Rom. Antiq) A long garment, descending to the ankles, worn by Roman women. "The stola was not allowed to be worn by courtesans, or by women who had been divorced from their husbands."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n stola An ample outer tunic or dress worn by Roman women over the under-tunic or chemise: it fell as low as the ankles or feet, and was gathered in around the waist by a girdle. It was a characteristic garment of the Roman matrons, as the toga was of the men, and divorced women and courtezans were not permitted to wear it. See cut in preceding column.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Stola the outer garment of the Roman matron: a chorister's surplice:
    • n Stola (her.) a bearing showing a fringed scarf
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. See Stole a garment
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. stola—Gr. stolē, a robe—stellein, to array.

Usage

In literature:

The women wore a TUNIC, STOLA, and PULLA.
"History of Rome from the Earliest times down to 476 AD" by Robert F. Pennell
Polly, on Orne's right, looked younger and softer in a green stola gown that hazed her barrel contours.
"Operation Haystack" by Frank Patrick Herbert
The stola is said to have been a more ample and ornamented sort of tunic.
"Museum of Antiquity" by L. W. Yaggy
The stola was a white garment with sleeves, which covered only the upper part of the arm; it was fastened above the shoulder with a clasp.
"Roman Women" by Alfred Brittain
Her white stola was also covered by a purple mantle, but without hem.
"A Struggle for Rome, v. 3" by Felix Dahn
Time was when I should have given them to Ilia as a border for her stola.
"The Tour" by Louis Couperus
White her hair, her dress the ancient palla and stola of white and purple, her jewels, amethysts.
"Saul of Tarsus" by Elizabeth Miller
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In poetry:

"Fui condotto all'aperto.--
Un frate colla stola
"Negra mi passo` accanto.
Lo seguivan dei ceffi
"Da ribaldi, che feano--orribili sberleffi
"A un meschin che legato--ne veniva con loro.
"Mastro Spaghi" by Ferdinando Fontana