Stirrup-iron

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Stirrup-iron the ring of iron attached to the stirrup-leather to receive the foot
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. stigerápstígan, to mount, ráp, a rope.

Usage

In literature:

Price, rising in his stirrups and brandishing his whip, flogged Nana with an arm of iron.
"Nana, The Miller's Daughter, Captain Burle, Death of Olivier Becaille" by Emile Zola
All the bits and stirrup-irons like silver.
"Robbery Under Arms" by Thomas Alexander Browne, AKA Rolf Boldrewood
The steady clip-crop of hoofs and clinking of iron stirrups broke the morning quiet.
"The Heritage of the Desert" by Zane Grey
My left arm was tied with a thong which was fastened to the stirrup-iron of a sergeant of Dragoons.
"The Adventures of Gerard" by Arthur Conan Doyle
The cold iron stirrups froze and cut the hunter's bootless feet.
"The Last of the Plainsmen" by Zane Grey
Cross-bows, stirrups, spurs, horse-furniture, reduced to scrap-iron, furnished axes, hammers, saws and nails.
"Days of the Discoverers" by L. Lamprey
They used to say that the horses needed all the care; bits and stirrup-irons did not matter.
"With Our Army in Palestine" by Antony Bluett
I gave it a few more blows with my stirrup iron, and then getting out my knife cut its throat.
"Adventures in Australia" by W.H.G. Kingston
The saddles had high peaks before and behind, and the stirrup-irons were in the shape of a fire-shovel.
"Great African Travellers" by W.H.G. Kingston
Back to the horse, to be again assailed by Number Two for not having obeyed the order about the bridoon and stirrup-irons.
"The Making Of A Novelist" by David Christie Murray
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