Stereopticon

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Stereopticon An instrument, consisting essentially of a magic lantern in which photographic pictures are used, by which the image of a landscape, or any object, may be thrown upon a screen in such a manner as to seem to stand out in relief, so as to form a striking and accurate representation of the object itself; also, a pair of magic lanterns for producing the effect of dissolving views.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n stereopticon An improved form of magic lantern, consisting essentially of two complete lanterns matched and connected. The object of the reduplication is to permit the pictures shown to pass from one to the next by a sort of dissolving effect which is secured by alternate use of the two lenses, and at the same time to avoid the delay or the unpleasant sliding of the pictures across the field in view of the audience, but imperfectly avoidable when the simple magic lantern is used. The two lanterns may be either superposed or placed side by side. Some forms of stereopticon are made with three lanterns.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Stereopticon ster-ē-op′ti-kon a double magic-lantern, by means of which the one picture appears to dissolve gradually into the other.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
NL. See Stereo-, and Optic

Usage

In literature:

The Colonel prefers them with the stereopticon.
"The Rise of Silas Lapham" by William Dean Howells
It looked like a colored photograph thrown from a stereopticon in a darkened theater.
"The Scarlet Car" by Richard Harding Davis
He could see her as clearly in her circle of electric lights as though she were a picture and held in the light of a stereopticon on a screen.
"Soldiers of Fortune" by Richard Harding Davis
I may explain that it was a talk illustrated by stereopticon.
"Sailing Alone Around The World" by Joshua Slocum
Magic Lanterns, Stereopticons, and Views of all kinds and prices for public exhibitions.
"Scientific American, Volume XLIII., No. 25, December 18, 1880" by Various
Ch., Stereopticon Col. 8.00 Tewksbury.
"American Missionary - Volume 50, No. 2, February, 1896" by Various
Ch., Stereopticon Lecture 10.00 Topsfield.
"The American Missionary -- Volume 48, No. 7, July, 1894" by Various
Let us now turn our "stereopticon on the screen of reminiscence," using the pictures furnished by Shakib.
"The Book of Khalid" by Ameen Rihani
Stereopticons, lenses of, 148.
"Common Science" by Carleton W. Washburne
Let me copy it, and then I'll throw it up with the stereopticon.
"The Galaxy" by Various
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In poetry:

Giving everybody a fair hearing.
They should have gone out with the balloon flights and the stereopticon.
This is no time for the private point of view.
When I light them, my nostrils prickle.
Their pale, tentative yellows
"Candles" by Sylvia Plath