Steeple-hat

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Steeple-hat a high and narrow-crowned hat
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. stýpel, stepelsteáp, steep.

Usage

In literature:

They had on three thousand cartridges, much hair, hats as high as church steeples, and lots of dirt.
"Adventures and Letters" by Richard Harding Davis
By the light of the lamp burning in the passage they beheld silhouetted upon the threshold a black figure crowned by a steeple hat.
"The Tavern Knight" by Rafael Sabatini
Has all spirit been taken out of you by the long-winded sermons of these knaves in steeple hats?
"Friends, though divided" by G. A. Henty
We also advise them to have lofty, napless, steeple-crowned hats.
"Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 1, August 7, 1841" by Various
We also advise them to have lofty, napless, steeple-crowned hats.
"Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete" by Various
See there; the steeple-top hat, copper buckle and all!
"The Entailed Hat" by George Alfred Townsend
Why, they are no more like than my hat is to the steeple of a church.
"The Boy Hunters" by Captain Mayne Reid
His steeple-crowned hat lay on the chair, with his sword beneath it.
"The Children of the New Forest" by Captain Marryat
Faith, is seated on forms; and the men wear their steeple-crowned hats.
"Bell's Cathedrals: The Cathedral Church of St. Paul" by Arthur Dimock
On their little shoes they had diamond buckles, and their great steeple-crowned hats were garlanded with beautiful flowers.
"Cornwall's Wonderland" by Mabel Quiller-Couch
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