Spontoon

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Spontoon (Mil) A kind of half-pike, or halberd, formerly borne by inferior officers of the British infantry, and used in giving signals to the soldiers.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n spontoon A kind of halberd or partizan formerly serving as the distinguishing arm for certain officers of the British infantry. Compare half-pike. Also called demi-pike.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Spontoon spon-tōōn′ a weapon somewhat like a halberd, which used to be carried by certain officers of foot.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. sponton, esponton, It. spontone, spuntone,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. sponton—It. spontonespuntare, to break off the point—puntonepunto, a point—L. pungĕre, punctum, to point.

Usage

In literature:

I must send Spontoon to see what she is about; he will find her out among the old regimental connexions.
"Waverley" by Sir Walter Scott
When Balbi wrote that his walls were hung with pictures of saints, it became a question of conveying the spontoon to him.
"The Historical Nights' Entertainment" by Rafael Sabatini
I must send Spontoon to see what she is about; he will find her out among the old regimental connections.
"Waverley, Or 'Tis Sixty Years Hence, Complete" by Sir Walter Scott
My mercer had his spontoon in his hand, as if he measured his cloth by that implement, instead of a legitimate yard.
"The Antiquary, Volume 1" by Sir Walter Scott
My mercer had his spontoon in his hand, as if he measured his cloth by that implement, instead of a legitimate yard.
"The Antiquary, Complete" by Sir Walter Scott
Only a quick thrust of his spontoon into the cliff saved him from falling almost a hundred feet.
"Pathfinders of the West" by A. C. Laut
When left alone, he examined it carefully, and realised that if pointed, it would make an excellent spontoon.
"The True Story Book"
The nobility, it was said, were the nursery for the spontoon.
"Pictures of German Life in the XVIIIth and XIXth Centuries, Vol. II." by Gustav Freytag
These articles, with our fur robes and blankets, a fish-spear, and a spontoon which I discovered, were all I dared attempt to save.
"The Little Red Foot" by Robert W. Chambers
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