Spean

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Spean (Scot.) to wean.
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. spanan; Ger. spänen.

Usage

In literature:

This would, I can suppose, account for the sloping terraces along the Spean.
"More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II" by Charles Darwin
VIEW OF THE MOUTHS OF GLEN ROY AND GLEN SPEAN.
"The Geological Evidence of The Antiquity of Man" by Charles Lyell
One of them, lying on the western side of the valley where it opens into Glen Spean, is crossed by a trap-dike.
"The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 13, No. 80, June, 1864" by Various
We halted for the night in Glen Spean, with Ben Chlin-aig looming high to the south, and the river gulping in ice beside our camp.
"John Splendid" by Neil Munro
The bottom of the Spean Valley, like the others, gradually rose, and therefore gradually approached the road on the adjacent mountain-side.
"Fragments of science, V. 1-2" by John Tyndall
An English officer, a prisoner taken at Spean, stood by, an unwilling spectator of the scene.
"The Red True Story Book" by Various
O for a good wat nurse to spean ye, like John Adamson's lambs!
"The Shepherd's Calendar" by James Hogg
A branch line connects with Spean Bridge on the West Highland railway via Invergarry.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 10, Slice 6" by Various
The lowest of these terraces is prolonged into Glen Spean.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 14, Slice 6" by Various
***

In news:

Veterans attend Commando Memorial at Spean Bridge to observe a two minute silence as a mark of respect for the war dead on November 11, 2011 in Spean Bridge, Scotland.
***