Soap-ball

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Soap-ball soap made into a ball, often with starch, as an emollient
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. sápe; Dut. zeep, Ger. seife.

Usage

In literature:

I've found her with onions, and last Tuesday I caught her on two balls of soap.
"The Virginian" by Owen Wister
They are making splendid soap at Vicksburg with china-balls.
"Strange True Stories of Louisiana" by George Washington Cable
The smell of soap and water, and cedar, and moth balls, and dust, and the ghost of a perfumery that Pinky used to use pervaded the hot attic.
"Half Portions" by Edna Ferber
They are making splendid soap at Vicksburg with china-balls.
"Famous Adventures And Prison Escapes of the Civil War" by Various
He sint me a box iv soap that made me smell like a coon goin' to a ball in a State Sthreet ca-ar.
"Mr. Dooley in Peace and in War" by Finley Peter Dunne
But Angiola threw down behind her one of the magic balls of yarn, and there arose a great mountain of soap.
"Italian Popular Tales" by Thomas Frederick Crane
In the farmhouse was an old man who understood making soap into cakes and balls, both for shaving and washing.
"Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen" by Hans Christian Andersen
In the farmyard they met an old man who knew how to make soap for shaving and washing, in cakes or in balls.
"Hans Andersen's Fairy Tales" by Hans Christian Andersen
***

In news:

The ABC soap operas General Hospital and Port Charles will be auctioning off gowns and costumes from the eighth annual Nurses Ball to benefit the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation.
***