Snuff-taker

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Snuff-taker one who snuffs habitually
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Dut. snuffen, snuf; Ger. schnaufen, to snuff.

Usage

In literature:

Glorious John was no snuff-taker.
"Lavengro The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest" by George Borrow
Unfortunately Mercury is no snuff-taker.
"Bleak House" by Charles Dickens
And as a snuff-taker he possessed a snuff-box, which was now empty.
"Rubur the Conqueror" by Jules Verne
It would be hard on this Occasion to mention the harmless Smoakers of Tobacco and Takers of Snuff.
"The Spectator, Volume 2." by Addison and Steele
It would be hard on this Occasion to mention the harmless Smoakers of Tobacco and Takers of Snuff.
"The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3" by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele
He was, in truth, a jovial man, as well as a great snuff-taker.
"Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. CCCXXIX." by Various
But the section of snuff-takers has, in common with all social categories, its apostates, its false brethren.
"Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 1, December 11, 1841" by Various
But the section of snuff-takers has, in common with all social categories, its apostates, its false brethren.
"Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete" by Various
Glorious John was no snuff-taker.
"Lavengro the Scholar - the Gypsy - the Priest" by George Borrow
During this time, Sir William, who was a snuff-taker, was continually using his snuff-box.
"The Jest Book" by Mark Lemon
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