Silk-mercer

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Silk-mercer a mercer or dealer in silks
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. seolc—L. sericum—Gr. sērikon, neut. of adj. Sērikos, pertaining to the SēresSēr, a native of China.

Usage

In literature:

You may as well say that a mercer will not sell silks to a woman of the town.
"Life of Johnson" by James Boswell
Mademoiselle Clairfait is the daughter of a silk-mercer, once established at Chalons-sur-Marne.
"After Dark" by Wilkie Collins
M. Camusot, the rich silk mercer of the Rue des Bourdonnais, had married Pons' first cousin, Mlle.
"Cousin Pons" by Honore de Balzac
He passed, dallying, the windows of Brown Thomas, silk mercers.
"Ulysses" by James Joyce
He would not receive as his niece the grand-daughter of a silk-mercer.
"Lucretia, Complete" by Edward Bulwer-Lytton
You may as well say that a mercer will not sell silks to a woman of the town.
"Life Of Johnson, Volume 4 (of 6)" by Boswell
M. Camusot, the rich silk mercer of the Rue des Bourdonnais, had married Pons' first cousin, Mlle.
"Poor Relations" by Honore de Balzac
We climbed out into a silk-mercer's shop.
"Helmet of Navarre" by Bertha Runkle
Its builder was a Mr John Rudyerd, a silk mercer of London.
"The Lighthouse" by R.M. Ballantyne
The most beautiful is to embroider in silk or mercerized cotton.
"Woodland Tales" by Ernest Seton-Thompson
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