Scuttle-butt

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Scuttle-butt a cask with a hole cut in it for the cup or dipper, for holding drinking-water in a ship
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. escoutille, a hatchway (Sp. escotilla), from Dut. schoot, the lap; Ger. schoss, bosom, a lap.

Usage

In literature:

Light she rode in the rude tide-rip, to left and right she rolled, And the skipper sat on the scuttle-butt and stared at an empty hold.
"Verses 1889-1896" by Rudyard Kipling
A pond in dimensions, and a scuttle-butt in taste.
"The Pathfinder" by James Fenimore Cooper
In this manner, they passed the buckets to fill the scuttle-butt.
"Moby Dick; or The Whale" by Herman Melville
Light she rode in the rude tide-rip, to left and right she rolled, And the skipper sat on the scuttle-butt and stared at an empty hold.
"Departmental Ditties and Barrack Room Ballads" by Rudyard Kipling
The scuttle-butt is the only fountain in the ship; and here alone can you drink, unless at your meals.
"White Jacket" by Herman Melville
The "Scuttle Butt Navigators," or, as the "Yankee" boys called them, the Rumor Committee, were very busy that bright day in May.
"A Gunner Aboard the "Yankee"" by Russell Doubleday
Get away on her so we can cast loose as soon as possible from that smoky scuttle butt.
"Sheila of Big Wreck Cove" by James A. Cooper
I think it had better be grog, for I cannot recommend the water we carry in our scuttle-butt.
"A Pirate of the Caribbees" by Harry Collingwood
A scuttle-butt was torn from its lashings and went by the board, and other flotsam followed it.
"Blow The Man Down" by Holman Day
Where's that there scuttle butt, I say?
"Turned Adrift" by Harry Collingwood
***

In poetry:

"So then they'd scoffed the last stale biscuit
An' the scuttle butt was all but dry,
They reckoned it was time to risk it,
An' tuk the boats an' said 'Good-bye.'"
"Doldrums: One Of Murphy's Yarns" by Cicely Fox Smith