Scrophularia

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Scrophularia type genus of Scrophulariaceae; named for the plants' supposed ability to cure scrofula: figworts
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Scrophularia (Bot) A genus of coarse herbs having small flowers in panicled cymes; figwort.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n scrophularia A genus of gamopetalous plants, type of the order Scrophu-larineæ, belonging to the tribe Cheloneæ. It is characterized by flowers with a deeply five cleft calyx, a nearly globose corolla with four short, flat, erect lobes and one spreading in front, four stamens with one-celled anthers, and often a scale-like staminode representing a fifth stamen. The fruit is a rigid two-celled septicidal capsule, roundish and commonly sharp-pointed, containing very numerous wrinkled seeds. There are about 120 species, chiefly Old World plants of the Mediterranean region, also extending widely through the north temperate zone, but very sparingly in America, where 3 species occur in the western United States, one of which, S. nodosa, flgwort, extends to the Atlantic and to Canada. They are smooth or bristly herbs, sometimes shrubby, and often fetid. They bear leaves which are chiefly opposite, and are often covered with pellucid dots, and loose cymes of greenish, purplish, or yellow flowers disposed in a terminal thyrsus. The species are known as figwort, especially S. aqvatica of England, also called water-betony, bullwort, and bishop's-leaves, and S. nodosa, a widely diffused species of Europe and America, used formerly in medicine in the treatment of scrofula, and occasionally still in making ointments for ulcers, etc. See brownwort.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Scrophularia skrof-ū-lā′ri-a the figwort genus of herbs, type of the Scrophulariaceæ or Scrophularineæ, a natural order containing almost 2000 known species, chiefly herbaceous and half-shrubby plants—Digitalis or Fox-glove, Calceolaria, Mimulus, Antirrhinum or Snap-dragon, Veronica or Speedwell, and Euphrasia or Eye-bright, &c.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
NL. So called because it was reputed to be a remedy for scrofula,

Usage

In literature:

On the high ridges before reaching Boga Panee, found an Astragalus; at Nonkreem, a Scrophularia.
"Journals of Travels in Assam, Burma, Bhootan, Afghanistan and TheNeighbouring Countries" by William Griffith
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In news:

Whether you call it redbirds in a tree or New Mexico figwort, Scrophularia macrantha is a cute perennial for dry sites with its panicles of rosy red blooms on compact plants.
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