Screw-wrench

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Screw-wrench a tool for grasping the flat sides of the heads of large screws
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Earlier scrue. O. Fr. escrou, prob. L. scrobem, accus. of scrobs, a hole; or Low Ger. schruve, Dut. schroef, Ice. skrufa, Ger. schraube.

Usage

In literature:

They couldn't do anything with it, because he had those nuts and screws and the wrench and other tools.
"The War in the Air" by Herbert George Wells
The more the fellows cringed to him, the tighter he wrenched the screw.
"The Pit" by Frank Norris
But who has the wrench, and who the screws?
"Around The Tea-Table" by T. De Witt Talmage
Take a monkey wrench and screw the inner sleeve down to the right to reduce the lift, and to the left to increase the lift.
"The Traveling Engineers' Association" by Anonymous
With a wrench Russ tightened the screws.
"The Moving Picture Girls at Sea" by Laura Lee Hope
I took a run, and brought my shoulder to bear just above the lock, wrenching the four screws out of the wood by the force of the blow.
"Dross" by Henry Seton Merriman
In one hand the youth held a Phillips screw driver, in the other a six-inch crescent wrench.
"The Servant Problem" by Robert F. Young
With trembling fingers he loosened the screwed-in nose of the tube with a wrench.
"The Seed of the Toc-Toc Birds" by Francis Flagg
What to thy spirit she will not display Cannot be wrenched from her with crowbar or with screw.
"The Faust-Legend and Goethe's 'Faust'" by H. B. Cotterill
One quiet and steady wrench brought an end-screw bodily out of the half-rotted wood.
"The Man Who Couldn't Sleep" by Arthur Stringer
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In news:

The DTT can be mounted on a wall or in a bench-top vise to allow a technician to quickly test torque wrenches and torque screw drivers.
But what about the screws that hold your wrench tips in place.
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