Rhapsodical

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • adj Rhapsodical rap-sod′ikal pertaining to, consisting of, or resembling rhapsody: gushing
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—L.,—Gr. rhapsōdia, rhaptein, to sew, ōdē, a song.

Usage

In literature:

Yes, I know I'm silly, and that you have the twins to rhapsodize about, but girls are so much more picturesque in the clothes!
"The Garden, You, and I" by Mabel Osgood Wright
She has no occasion either to pose or to rhapsodize.
"The Vitalized School" by Francis B. Pearson
Then I heard his lips move in the rhapsodic deglutition of babyland dreams.
"The Prairie Wife" by Arthur Stringer
For Eleanor she had always had a liking; about Eleanor's mother she became rhapsodical.
"Six to Sixteen" by Juliana Horatia Ewing
A vision for an artist to rhapsodize over; but for a God to paint!
"The Cave of Gold" by Everett McNeil
The anti-slavery movement in Pennsylvania never went to the rhapsodical extremes we find in Massachusetts.
"The Journal of Negro History, Volume 2, 1917" by Various
The slow movement continues the rhapsodical spirit of the first movement.
"The Masters and their Music" by W. S. B. Mathews
She conceived scenes in which she was haughtily rhapsodic in defending her good, sensible husband before them.
"The Job" by Sinclair Lewis
As Marie Louise with unwitting enthusiasm rhapsodized over the shipyard Jake's interest kindled.
"The Cup of Fury" by Rupert Hughes
Well, come out presently when you feel you're rhapsodized enough.
"I'll Leave It To You" by Noel Coward
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In poetry:

The Burne-Jones cartons
Have preserved her eyes;
Still, at the Tate, they teach
Cophetua to rhapsodize;
"Yeux Glauques" by Ezra Pound

In news:

People are always singing its praises, of course, rhapsodizing over its extreme weather, its rugged terrain, its dizzying coastal paths, its clotted cream, its superior sheep.
They eagerly anticipated the spring's first shipment of annual color and would spend hours planting, watering, weeding and rhapsodizing about the results.
Green Lantern' writer-producer GEOFF JOHNS waxes rhapsodic about Hollywood, Hal Jordan and his brightest days.
Salafis, or Islamic fundamentalists, rhapsodize about founding political parties and forging alliances with the more mainstream Muslim Brotherhood to maximize the religious vote in Egypt after the fall of Hosni Mubarak.
In 2008 he was prominently supportive of Obama, about whom he rhapsodized in nearly messianic terms.
Adapted by Guillermo del Toro from Mike Mignola's cult comic, Hellboy is both jocular and rhapsodic.
Yesterday, we told you about Sloane Crosley's debut on the Times 's nonfiction paperback bestseller list, yet we neglected to rhapsodize about the #1 book on the hardcover fiction list.
TUCSON--Bagging rays under a crisp blue sky backed by a postcard-perfect view of the majestic Santa Catalina Mountains, the husband-and-wife writing team of Jane and Michael Stern rhapsodize over the Western wonderland we know as Arizona.
Herman Melville rhapsodizes about it in the opening chapter of "Moby-Dick".
), it shouldn't shock you that I can rhapsodize easily, if not professionally, about pie - pecan being my absolute favorite.
" Footnotes are "a rhapsodic grace note" in a master's hands, a journalist wrote.
Back home they might wax rhapsodic about a few hours mucking about with bricks and mortar.
When the urchins in the musical "Oliver" waxed rhapsodic about "food, glorious food," they must have been singing about Ohio — just as surely as Ohioans know that with a name like Smucker's, it has to be good.
Plume 's wine director, who also spent three years at the world-class French Laundry in Napa Valley, talks about wine the way Leonard Bernstein rhapsodized about music.
"Douse hair with gasoline/Set it light and set it free," Harvey rhapsodizes on "Man-Size," from her second album, Rid of Me.
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