Revocation of the edict of Nantes

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Revocation of the edict of Nantes the taking away by Louis IV., in 1685, of the Huguenot privileges granted by Henry IV. in 1598
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—L. revocārere-, back, vocāre, to call.

Usage

In literature:

The persecutions which followed the revocation of the Edict of Nantes outdid even Titus Oates.
"The Conquest of New France" by George M. Wrong
The other claimant is of French descent and name; came over at the revocation of the Edict of Nantes.
"Sybil or the Two Nations" by Benjamin Disraeli
The persecution of the Hugonots in consequence of the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, was condemned by the greatest men in France.
"The Life of Hugo Grotius" by Charles Butler
The citizens of Montauban had been terribly treated before and after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes.
"The Huguenots in France" by Samuel Smiles
THE REVOCATION OF THE EDICT OF NANTES.
"Louis XIV., Makers of History Series" by John S. C. Abbott
By the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, a large number of the bourgeoisie, or middle class, was driven from France.
"History of Human Society" by Frank W. Blackmar
His father was a Huguenot, and at the revocation of the edict of Nantes was obliged to abandon his native country.
"Glimpses of the Past" by W. O. Raymond
HISTORY OF THE FRENCH PROTESTANT REFUGEES, from the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes.
"Notes and Queries, Number 237, May 13, 1854" by Various
Revocation of the Edict of Nantes.
"Woman's Club Work and Programs" by Caroline French Benton
After the revocation of the edict of Nantes the settlement of some French refugees further stimulated this industry.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Slice 2" by Various
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