Pumiced

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • a Pumiced (Far) Affected with a kind of chronic laminitis in which there is a growth of soft spongy horn between the coffin bone and the hoof wall. The disease is called pumiced foot, or pumice foot.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: The only rock that floats in water is pumice.
    • pumiced Noting a diseased condition or degeneration of the inside portions (laminæ) of the hoof and sole of horses' feet following founder, in which the laminæ become replaced by a soft, crumbly material.
    • n pumiced A pump operated by hydraulic pressure to pump water at a higher or a lower pressure than that which operates the pump; a pressure-increaser or booster, or a pressure-reducer.
    • n pumiced A pump for moving or raising a liquid by the pressure of air or by carrying the liquid along with the air; an air-lift.
    • ***

Usage

In literature:

Now red scoria and pumice and sulphur boiled and rolled where the hard lava had frayed our boots.
"Cumner & South Sea Folk, Complete" by Gilbert Parker
In 1797 an eruption hurled out pumice, ashes, and sulphureous vapours.
"At Last" by Charles Kingsley
D. PUMICED-FOOT, DROPPED SOLE, OR CONVEX SOLE.
"Diseases of the Horse's Foot" by Harry Caulton Reeks
Boiling alkaline solutions and a free use of powdered pumice and the scrubbing brush must on no account be neglected.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 586, March 26, 1887" by Various
These scions he obtained by planting the pumice of wild crab apples from which cider had been made.
"George Washington: Farmer" by Paul Leland Haworth
The wood was carefully rubbed with oil and pumice, and the shellac finish was rubbed to a soft glow.
"Furnishing the Home of Good Taste" by Lucy Abbot Throop
The cloud was mixed with quantities of pumice and fragments of what appeared to be black glass.
"Blown to Bits" by Robert Michael Ballantyne
I want naturalists carefully to examine floating seaweed and pumice met with at sea.
"Alfred Russel Wallace: Letters and Reminiscences Vol 2 (of 2)" by James Marchant
The road running up the mountain, over gray and red pumice strata, was deeply worn, just like the road back of Cochiti, New Mexico.
"In Indian Mexico (1908)" by Frederick Starr
In st. 39, l. 8, 'puny' is a misprint for 'pumy' = pumice; in st. 40, l. 3, 'sang' similarly misreads 'song' = sung, or were singing.
"The Prose Works of William Wordsworth" by William Wordsworth
***

In news:

Back in August, an enormous floating mass of pumice was spotted in the South Pacific Ocean off the coast of New Zealand.
The streamers of pumice (likely each less than a few kilometers across) from the July 18, 2012 eruption of Havre seamount spreading across the Pacific Ocean.
The pumice has spread over an area of over 250,00 square kilometers in a little over one month.
The Source of Kermadec Island Pumice Raft.
Terra image of the Havre plume and pumice , taken on the morning of July 18, 2012.
Huge pumice rock 'island' seen floating in South Pacific.
Volcanic Ash and Pumice From Puyehue.
Volcanic Ash and Pumice From Puyehue.
Scientists say the floating field of golf ball-sized pumice probably came from an underwater volcano and not from the eruption of Mount Tongariro.
An area of floating pumice is spotted southwest of Raoul island, off the coast of New Zealand.
Chi-square analysis was used to compare the number of bracket failures between the pumice and fluoride varnish groups and the number of patients in each group experiencing at least one bond failure.
Cornell Farm's custom blend (includes pumice - great for containers ).
One of my least favorite tasks—next to scrubbing toilets with a pumice stone—is vacuuming under the couch and chair cushions .
The volcano had a small eruption in August during the "Big Kiwi Volcano Week" when White Island and Tongariro erupted and the pumice raft was discovered in the Kermadec Islands .
The formations of Chiricahua National Monument are the result of a large-scale volcanic event, a mixture of ash and pumice that fused into a tuff of rhyolite and eroded over time.
***

In science:

Glasses have been of use to mankind from early on, be it as arrowheads for the stone age people of Corsica and the Americas, the obsidian battle axes and swords of the Aztecs, pumice scrappers for animal hides, or the tektite ornaments and fertility symbols of our ancestors.
Formulation of thermodynamics for the glassy state: configurational energy as a modest source of energy
***