Puddening

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Puddening (Naut) A quantity of rope-yarn, or the like, placed, as a fender, on the bow of a boat.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n puddening A thick pad of rope-yarns, oakum, etc., covered with a mat or canvas, and tapering from the middle toward the ends, used as a fender on the bow of a boat. When rope cables were used, the covering of soft rope and canvas on the ring of an anchor was so called. Also called pudding.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Puddening pud′ning a thick pad of rope, &c., used as a fender on the bow of a boat.
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Probably fr. pudden, for pudding, in allusion to its softness

Usage

In literature:

Miss Kitty, will you have hard or soft sarse with your pudden?
"The Birds' Christmas Carol" by Kate Douglas Wiggin
Provisioning ship, puddening the anchor.
"The Logbooks of the Lady Nelson" by Ida Lee
Her head was done up in this here veil like a pudden in a cloth and she had a small hat on.
"The Mystery of 31 New Inn" by R. Austin Freeman
Last Sunday, afore thy father's buryin', we'd a dinner of duck and green peas, and leg of lamb, and custard pudden, and ale.
"Fern's Hollow" by Hesba Stretton
He confidentially whispered to Mr. Terry that no doubt nagurs had sowls and were human, but he wasn't pudden' fond of their society.
"Two Knapsacks" by John Campbell
I wisht I hat genius und could make a pudden!
"The Mystic Will" by Charles Godfrey Leland
But they hadn't danced two steps when the meat and the puddens flew out of her pockets.
"Childhood's Favorites and Fairy Stories" by Various
She'd try and 'tice her to ate suffen, {56a} when yar father sent her a bit o' pudden.
"Two Suffolk Friends" by Francis Hindes Groome
Had boiled Beef, Leg of Lamb and plum Pudden.
"Highways & Byways in Sussex" by E.V. Lucas
Miss Kitty, will you have hard or soft sarse with your pudden?
"The Bird's Christmas Carol" by Kate Douglas Wiggin
I'll wait for the pudden.
"Fix Bay'nets" by George Manville Fenn
Rail against roasted beef and good plum pudden?
"Ebrietatis Encomium" by Boniface Oinophilus
This was a fact; and when Jack and his wife were seen followin' the pudden, the whole neighbourhood was soon up and afther it.
"The Irish Fairy Book" by Various
Faith, it's quite clear that if you weren't a gentlemanly pudden all out, you'd act otherwise.
"Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry" by William Butler Yeats
There's a good girl; and if there's a bit o' cold pudden, or anything else, let's have it too.
"Of High Descent" by George Manville Fenn
There's a good girl; and if there's a bit o' cold pudden, or anything else, let's have it too.
"The Haute Noblesse" by George Manville Fenn
This was a fact; and when Jack and his wife were seen followin' the pudden, the whole neighbourhood was soon up and after it.
"Humours of Irish Life" by Various
Sir Pudden, to Reuben's extreme sorrow, regretfully became soup in the year 1699.
"Wilderness of Spring" by Edgar Pangborn
A rope or strap round a mast to support the puddening, where the lower yards rest in the slings.
"The Seaman's Friend" by Richard Henry Dana
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In poetry:

So I said, " Listen, Comrades!
I've just thought of a good 'un!
We haven't a shell to blow 'em to ...
But there's my old woman's bread-pudden!"
"The Bugle Calls? (Rat-a-tat! Plonk! Plonk!)" by T W Connor
And there on a cloud - far away from the crowd
In a real Paradise, not a 'dud' 'un,
I'll do nowt for ever and ever and ever
But gollup up real Yorkshire pudden!
"Yorkshire Pudden" by Weston and Lee
The real Yorkshire pudden's a poem in batter,
To make one's an art not a trade,
Now listen to me - for I'm going to tell thee
How t' first Yorkshire pudden wor made.
"Yorkshire Pudden" by Weston and Lee
The t'owd woman looking at clock said 'By Gum!
He's due home from mill is my Dan,
You get on Wi' ye tea, but ye must excuse me,
I must make pudden now for t'owd man.'
"Yorkshire Pudden" by Weston and Lee
And when it wor done and she put it in t'oven
She said t'owd woman 'Goodbye',
Then she flew away leaving the first Yorkshire pudden
That ever was made - and that's why.
"Yorkshire Pudden" by Weston and Lee
It's what? - Yorkshire pudden!, now coom coom coom,
It's what! Yorkshire pudden d'ye say!
It's pudden I'll grant you - it's some sort o' pudden,
But not Yorkshire pudden, nay nay!
"Yorkshire Pudden" by Weston and Lee