Pomander

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Pomander A perfume to be carried with one, often in the form of a ball.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n pomander A perfume-ball, or a mixture of perfumes, formerly carried in the pocket or suspended from the neck or the girdle, especially as an amulet, or to prevent infection in time of plague.
    • n pomander A hollow ball or round box used for carrying about the person the ball above described, and sometimes pierced with small openings to allow the perfume to escape.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Pomander pō-man′dėr (Shak.) a perfumed ball, or box containing perfumes, formerly supposed to ward off infection.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Sp. poma,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. pomme d'ambre, apple of amber.

Usage

In literature:

She had no desire for the pomander, and did not know why she had bought it.
"The Early Short Fiction of Edith Wharton, Part 1 (of 10)" by Edith Wharton
He shrugged and pouted and had fresh recourse to his pomander.
"The Strolling Saint" by Raphael Sabatini
Pomander sneered, to draw him out.
"Peg Woffington" by Charles Reade
POMANDER, ball of perfume, worn or hung about the person to prevent infection, or for foppery.
"Volpone; Or, The Fox" by Ben Jonson
POMANDER, ball of perfume, worn or hung about the person to prevent infection, or for foppery.
"The Alchemist" by Ben Jonson
POMANDER, ball of perfume, worn or hung about the person to prevent infection, or for foppery.
"The Poetaster" by Ben Jonson
POMANDER, ball of perfume, worn or hung about the person to prevent infection, or for foppery.
"Sejanus: His Fall" by Ben Jonson
POMANDER, ball of perfume, worn or hung about the person to prevent infection, or for foppery.
"Every Man In His Humor" by Ben Jonson
Whose shadow smells like milder pomander?
"The Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2" by Robert Herrick
Masks, but rarely; nor neither fans nor pomanders.
"Clare Avery" by Emily Sarah Holt
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In poetry:

Lavender, sweet-briar, orris. Here
Shall Beauty make her pomander,
Her sweet-balls for to lay in clothes
That wrap her as the leaves the rose.
"The Choice" by Katharine Tynan
But as Pomanders and wood
Still are good,
Yet being bruis'd are better sented;
God, to show how farre his love
Could improve,
Here, as broken, is presented.
"The Banquet " by George Herbert
Then should the Pomander, which was before
A speaking sweet, mend by reflection,
And tell me more:
For pardon of my imperfection
Would warm and work it sweeter than before.
"The Odour. 2 Cor. II. " by George Herbert

In news:

A floral pomander serves as a table centerpiece.
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