Pomace

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Pomace The substance of apples, or of similar fruit, crushed by grinding.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n pomace The substance of apples or of similar fruit crushed by grinding.
    • n pomace Fish-scrap or refuse of fishes from which the oil has been extracted. It is dried by exposure to the sun and ground up into fish-guano. Pomace is very extensively manufactured from the menhaden. Crude pomace is called chum.
    • n pomace The cake left after expressing castor-oil from the beans.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Pomace the substance of apples or similar fruit: fish-scrap
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. ponum, a fruit, LL., an apple: cf. LL. pomagium, pomacium,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. pomum, an apple.

Usage

In literature:

Cakes of pomace lay against the walls in the yellow sun, where they were drying to be used as fuel.
"The Woodlanders" by Thomas Hardy
In one garden pomegranates, a pomaceous tree, and mulberries, whose fruit is now ripe but quite devoid of flavour, occurred.
"Journals of Travels in Assam, Burma, Bhootan, Afghanistan and TheNeighbouring Countries" by William Griffith
Mr. Earle was questioned about the use of castor bean pomace for strawberries.
"Prairie Farmer, Vol. 56: No. 1, January 5, 1884." by Various
The nuts and holes frequently clogged with the pomace.
"Home Life in Colonial Days" by Alice Morse Earle
Her face is flecked with pomace and she drools A cider syrup.
"Mountain Interval" by Robert Frost
If the pomace is permitted to ferment, and afterwards is distilled, a product called pomace-brandy is made.
"Manual of American Grape-Growing" by U. P. Hedrick
Thrusting his arm down through the peach pomace, he found mash underneath.
"Our Southern Highlanders" by Horace Kephart
After the juice has been extracted from the apples the pomace that remains is sometimes used as a fertilizer.
"The Apple" by Various
Cider was tediously made at first by pounding the apples in wooden mortars; the pomace was afterward pressed in baskets.
"Stage-coach and Tavern Days" by Alice Morse Earle
This is generally selected and separated from the fresh pomace left on the press in cider-making.
"American Pomology" by J. A. Warder
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In news:

Olive oil pomace 1 tsp.
Keep on trucking that pomace .
The back porch held a sweet, pomaceous aroma, and immediately I knew Grandma had baked an apple pie for dessert.
Grappa, an Italian spirit, is made from grape pomace (the skins, seeds and stems left over from winemaking).
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