Poison-fang

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Poison-fang one of two large tubular teeth in the upper jaw of venomous serpents, through which poison passes from glands at their roots when the animal bites
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—L. potio, a draught—potāre, to drink.

Usage

In literature:

He twisted out of Hercules' grasp, and darted out his forked tongue at him, showing his poisonous fangs.
"Tell Me Another Story" by Carolyn Sherwin Bailey
One square strike from those poisonous fangs and Pawnee Brown's hours would be numbered.
"The Boy Land Boomer" by Ralph Bonehill
The fly was quickly killed by her poison fangs, and then carried to the corner to be consumed at leisure.
"Wild Nature Won By Kindness" by Elizabeth Brightwen
They've got poisoned fangs.
"Burr Junior" by G. Manville Fenn
This swelling is made by the poison bags which communicate with their hollow fangs.
"First in the Field" by George Manville Fenn
And he placed great crooked fangs in her mouth and filled them with poison.
"The Secret of the Creation" by Howard D. Pollyen
It takes but a minute for the poison from the Diamond-back's fangs to kill a rabbit.
"Pathfinder" by Alan Douglas
Such men are more dreadful than the ingali, who rears up from the grass and plunges his poison-fangs in your leg.
"Sanders of the River" by Edgar Wallace
The cat's breath was deadly poison, and the serpents' fangs no man might feel and live.
"The Old-Fashioned Fairy Book" by Constance Cary Harrison
Yet I am never conscious of the bloody fang, the poison tooth, of the wilderness.
"Jungle Peace" by William Beebe
She appreciates no difference between poison in the fangs of snakes and mercy in the hearts of men.
"The Works of Robert G. Ingersoll, Vol. 1 (of 12) Dresden Edition--Lectures" by Robert G. Ingersoll
Superstition is the serpent that crawls and hisses in every Eden and fastens its poisonous fangs in the hearts of men.
"The Works of Robert G. Ingersoll, Vol. 4 (of 12) Dresden Edition--Lectures" by Robert G. Ingersoll
Superstition is a terrible serpent, reaching in frightful coils from heaven to earth and thrusting its poisoned fangs into the hearts of men.
"The Works of Robert G. Ingersoll, Vol. 12 (of 12) Dresden Edition--Miscellany" by Robert G. Ingersoll
And gentle Susan Monnerie was kind enough to smear a little poison on the fangs.
"Memoirs of a Midget" by Walter de la Mare
I mean him who gives fangs to the viper, and poison to the snake!
"The Huguenot: (Volumes I-III)" by G. P. R. (George Payne Rainsford) James
Some of them have poison fangs and are reputed to inflict fatal wounds.
"Book of Monsters" by David Fairchild and Marian Hubbard (Bell) Fairchild
Once let those recurved fangs strike home, and there is no poison in them, all hope is gone to the victim.
"Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures in Art" by John Vinycomb
The poison-fangs are as long as a parrot's claws.
"Twenty-Five Years in a Waggon in South Africa" by Andrew A. Anderson
We examined the poisonous fangs, took the rattles with us and hung the bodies on a tree.
"Historic Highways of America (Vol. 12)" by Archer Butler Hulbert
The poisonous fangs had been driven deep into the flesh and the deadly venom was beginning to take effect.
"The White Rose of Memphis" by William C. Falkner
***

In poetry:

Their poisons collected afford
Lethargic relief to his pangs;
And Death! of all nature the lord!
Thy shadows now rest on his fangs.
"The Lion" by William Hayley
The Mexic native fears not fang
Of poisonous serpent, vine, nor bee,
If he may soothe the baleful pang
With juices of this "holy tree."
"Paulo Santo" by Frances Fuller Victor
Those hearts of ours -- how weak! how weak!
But a single word of unkindness speak,
Like a poisoned shaft, like a viper's fang,
That one slight word leaves a life-long pang.
"A Reverie" by Abram Joseph Ryan
The Censor is a hooded snake
That lurks within the grass,
And rears to sink his poison-fangs
In heedless babes that pass -
Dear Children of my brain; wee, tender things,
That sink and swoon and perish when he stings.
"The Censor" by C J Dennis