Podocarpus

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Podocarpus evergreen trees or shrubs; sometimes classified as member of the family Taxaceae
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n podocarpus A genus of coniferous trees of the tribe Taxoideæ, characterized by solitary or twin pistillate flowers surrounded by a few scales, bearing a somewhat stalked and projecting blade, which envelops the single adnate and inverted ovule. In fruit this blade usually becomes fleshy, forming a pulpy covering to the hard shelllike seed, which contains a thin embryo with two seed-leaves only, in fleshy albumen. The staminate flowers are solitary or in clusters of from two to five, or in long catkins, the stamens forming a long dense column covered with sessile two-celled anthers in spiral rows. There are from 40 to 60 species, forming much the largest coniferous genus except Pinus. They are chiefly natives of the southern hemisphere beyond the tropics, and also frequent in montane and eastern tropical Asia. They are evergreen trees, with much diversity in foliage : the leaves are either scattered, opposite, two-ranked, or crowded; scale-like, linear, or broad; and veinless or with many fine parallel veins. The fruit is a globular or ovoid drupe or nut, 1½ inches or less in diameter, in some species edible, as P. andina, the plum-fir of Chili, with clusters of cherry-like fruits, and P. spinulosa, the native plum or damson of New South Wales, also called Mawarra pine and white pine. Several other species are known as fir or pine among the colonists of New Zealand, Australia, and Cape Colony. Compare fir and pine, and for individual species see kahikatea, matai, and miro. Many species are among the most important timber-trees of the southern hemisphere, as (besides the preceding). P Totara, the mahogany-pine; P. cupressina, the kaw-tabua, one of the chief timber-trees of Java; and the various yellow-woods of Cape Colony. (See yellow-wood.) Others are a source of valuable gums, as P. polystachya, the wax-dammar of Singapore. Some are but bushes, others reach a great height, as P. amara of Java (200 feet), and the yacca-tree of the West Indies (100 feet). Some botanists use the name of the section Nageia for the whole genus.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Podocarpus pod-ō-kär′pus a genus of tropical coniferous trees.
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. pous, podos, foot, karpos, fruit.

Usage

In literature:

This view is applicable, though less manifestly, also to Cupressinae; and might even be extended to Podocarpus and Dacrydium.
"Narrative of a Survey of the Intertropical and Western Coasts of Australia] [Volume 2 of 2]" by Phillip Parker King
I did not observe Podocarpus.
"Journals of Travels in Assam, Burma, Bhootan, Afghanistan and TheNeighbouring Countries" by William Griffith
The leaves remind one of the leaves of the subspecies nageia of the existing genus Podocarpus.
"Farthest North" by Fridtjof Nansen
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In science:

Dioecy-induced spatial patterns of two codominant tree species, Podocarpus nagi and Neolitsea aciculata.
A New Family of Random Graphs for Testing Spatial Segregation
Dioecy-induced spatial patterns of two codominant tree species, Podocarpus nagi and Neolitsea aciculata.
Overall and Pairwise Segregation Tests Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Dioecy-induced spatial patterns of two codominant tree species, Podocarpus nagi and Neolitsea aciculata.
New Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Dioecy-induced spatial patterns of two codominant tree species, Podocarpus nagi and Neolitsea aciculata.
Class-Specific Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Dioecy-induced spatial patterns of two codominant tree species, Podocarpus nagi and Neolitsea aciculata.
Directional Clustering Tests Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
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