Picaresque novels

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Picaresque novels the tales of Spanish rogue and vagabond life, much in vogue in the 17th century
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Sp. picaronpícaro, a rogue.

Usage

In literature:

Then there were some of the writers of the picaresque novels.
"Lavengro The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest" by George Borrow
Why not drift on in a series of accidents-like a picaresque novel?
"Women in Love" by D. H. Lawrence
The realism of Defoe and Hogarth, and the Spanish Picaresque novel.
"The Unity of Civilization" by Various
Then there were some of the writers of the picaresque novels.
"Lavengro The Scholar - The Gypsy - The Priest, Vol. 2 (of 2)" by George Borrow
Picaresque novels.+ The picaresque novels do not deal with love, but with intrigues for material gain in the widest sense.
"Folkways" by William Graham Sumner
You might have written a picaresque novel or a picaresque short story, anyway.
"Imaginary Interviews" by W. D. Howells
Spain is the home of that type of novel which the pigeonhole-makers have named picaresque.
"Rosinante to the Road Again" by John Dos Passos
Then there were some of the writers of the picaresque novels.
"Lavengro The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest" by George Borrow
After the Tales of Chivalry came the Novelas de Picaros, picaresque novels we have called these Tales of Roguery in English.
"The Century of Columbus" by James J. Walsh
Christoffel von Grimmelshausen (c. 1625-1676), is a picaresque novel, but one that owed little more than its form to the Spaniards.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 11, Slice 7" by Various
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In news:

Dumas' picaresque novel was first published in serial format in 1844.
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