Pea-stone

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Pea-stone pisolite
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
M. E. pese, pl. pesen and peses—A.S. pisa, pl. pisan—L. pisum, Gr. pison.

Usage

In literature:

We knew what a very little stone in your boot will do, let alone peas.
"The Wouldbegoods" by E. Nesbit
I didn't mean old peas and hair shirts and sleeping on the stones.
"The Story of the Amulet" by E. Nesbit
It's a stone idol, or god, or revised statute or something, and it looks as much like High Jack as one green pea looks like itself.
"Options" by O. Henry
The man at once placed a pea on a stone, and, drawing his bow, he shot it in the middle with the greatest possible ease.
"The Grey Fairy Book" by Various
Children are apt to push beans, peas, fruit-stones, buttons, and other small objects, into the nose.
"A Practical Physiology" by Albert F. Blaisdell
One woman has a stone, no larger than a pea, brought from a mine in South Africa.
"The Spinster Book" by Myrtle Reed
An old mouse was running in and out over the stone doorstep, carrying peas and beans to her family in the wood.
"Childhood's Favorites and Fairy Stories" by Various
An old mouse was running in and out over the stone doorstep, carrying peas and beans to her family in the wood.
"Children's Literature" by Charles Madison Curry
From my pocket I took a small square bit of stone of the cubical contents of a small pea.
"The Strange Adventures of Mr. Middleton" by Wardon Allan Curtis
The man at once placed a pea on a stone, and, drawing his bow, he shot it in the middle with the greatest possible ease.
"The Grey Fairy Book" by Andrew Lang
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