Ostent

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Ostent Appearance; air; mien.
    • Ostent Manifestation; token; portent. "We asked of God that some ostent might clear
      Our cloudy business, who gave us sign."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n ostent The act of showing, or an act which shows; hence, manifestation; indication; display; profession.
    • n ostent Aspect; air; manner; mien.
    • n ostent That which is pointed out as strange or alarming; a sign; portent; wonder; prodigy.
    • ostent To show; make a display of; flourish.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Ostent (Shak.) appearance, manner: token: portent, prodigy
    • ***

Quotations

  • John Locke
    John%20Locke
    “Fashion for the most part is nothing but the ostentation of riches.”
  • Edwin Hubbel Chapin
    Edwin%20Hubbel%20Chapin
    “Ostentation is the signal flag of hypocrisy.”
  • William Hutton
    William Hutton
    “The charity that hastens to proclaim its good deeds, ceases to be charity, and is only pride and ostentation.”
  • Seneca
    Seneca
    “That which is given with pride and ostentation is rather an ambition than a bounty.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. ostentus, ostentum, fr. ostendere,p. p. ostensus, and ostentus,) to show. See Ostensible
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. ostendĕre, ostensum, to show.

Usage

In literature:

He had a singular abhorrence of luxury, waste, and ostentation.
"Captains of Industry" by James Parton
Their meeting place was furnished without ostentation, and in excellent taste.
"Dross" by Henry Seton Merriman
Only the thing must be done neatly and without ostentation, for the sake of our friend who comes.
"Mr. Grex of Monte Carlo" by E. Phillips Oppenheim
He spent this vast wealth with princely ostentation.
"History of the English People, Volume III (of 8)" by John Richard Green
He is a great enemy to formality, etiquette, ostentation and luxury.
"The Writings of Thomas Jefferson" by Thomas Jefferson
And if there was generosity in this impulse, I fear that there was ostentation too.
"Dr. Jolliffe's Boys" by Lewis Hough
Tom would not like to see it, she well knew; he detested anything which looked like ostentation.
"The Gold that Glitters" by Emily Sarah Holt
Edwin having been to the Bank himself, instead of sending Stifford, had departed with the minimum of ostentation.
"Clayhanger" by Arnold Bennett
Precious stones and pearls farther much this vain ostentation.
"Mexico and its Religion" by Robert A. Wilson
There was no ostentation, no hypocrisy, no cant; but heartfelt gratitude, and humble reliance on God's protecting hand.
"Salt Water" by W. H. G. Kingston
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In poetry:

From seas whose cyclic ebb and sweep,
Unseen to Life's oblivious hours,
Are ostent of the changeless Pow'rs
That hold dominion of the Deep.
"The Testimony of the Suns" by George Sterling
The crisis suited not with pomp, and she
Whose anguish bears the seal of consecration
Had wished his Christian obsequies should be
Thus void of ostentation.
"Obsequies Of Stuart" by John Reuben Thompson
IN vision I roamed the flashing Firmament,
So fierce in blazon that the Night waxed wan,
As though with an awed sense of such ostent;
And as I thought my spirit ranged on and on
"In Vision I Roamed" by Thomas Hardy

In news:

Friendship, like all truth, delights in plainness and simplicity, and it is the counterfeit alone that needs ornament and ostentation.
Solid and Cozy, Short on Ostentation .
No sense, save for the logic of pure ostentation.
It's ostentation for its own sake when one of the richest men in America and his trophy wife attempt to build themselves a palace—only to find themselves on a collision course with an economic reality they helped to create.
When the curtain goes up on season's opening at the Metropolitan Opera, the audience presents a picture of aristocratic splendor and ostentation.
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In science:

It could be due to a decrease in royal power or to a poorer economy. “They are smaller than their predecessors, and are built of low quality local stone”. That is, less resources for ostentation, echoing Pliny.
Abusir: from Pliny the Elder to Google Maps
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