Ophiuchus

Definitions

  • Ophiuchus and the Neighbouring Constellations
    Ophiuchus and the Neighbouring Constellations
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Ophiuchus a large constellation in the equatorial region between Hercules and Scorpius
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Ophiuchus (Astron) A constellation in the Northern Hemisphere, delineated as a man holding a serpent in his hands; -- called also Serpentarius.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n Ophiuchus An ancient northern constellation, representing a man holding a serpent; the Serpent-bearer. Also called Serpentarius. The Serpent is now treated as a separate constellation.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L., fr. Gr. , lit., holding a serpent; 'o`fis a serpent + to hold

Usage

In literature:

Oceans of Hochheimer, a Throat like that of Ophiuchus: speak not of them; to the infinite Shoeblack they are as nothing.
"Sartor Resartus The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdrockh" by Thomas Carlyle
They were Christian missionaries from a planet called Heaven out in Ophiuchus Sector.
"The Lani People" by J. F. Bone
A HALF-HOUR WITH BOOTES, SCORPIO, OPHIUCHUS, ETC.
"Half-hours with the Telescope" by Richard A. Proctor
Oceans of Hochheimer, a Throat like that of Ophiuchus: speak not of them; to the infinite Shoeblack they are as nothing.
"Sartor Resartus, and On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic in History" by Thomas Carlyle
Ophiuchus is represented as an old man, holding in his hands a writhing serpent.
"A Field Book of the Stars" by William Tyler Olcott
The variable star in Ophiuchus has an analogous system, and observation has already revealed a great number of others.
"Astronomy for Amateurs" by Camille Flammarion
Towards the end of September 1604, a new star made its appearance in the constellation Ophiuchus, or the Serpent-Bearer.
"Myths and Marvels of Astronomy" by Richard A. Proctor
And so they were utterly defeated at the Battle of Ophiuchus.
"A Question of Courage" by Jesse Franklin Bone
In 1604 a conspicuous new star burst forth in Ophiuchus.
"The Astronomy of Milton's 'Paradise Lost'" by Thomas Orchard
In 1604 Kepler recorded a similar star in the constellation of Ophiuchus which grew to be as bright as Jupiter.
"Astronomy of To-day" by Cecil G. Dolmage
Still as a crown it shines, its station 'midst Where stout Alcides Ophiuchus grasps.
"The Metamorphoses of Publius Ovidus Naso in English blank verse Vols. I & II" by Ovid
The southern part of the constellation Ophiuchus is almost inextricably mingled with Scorpio.
"Pleasures of the telescope" by Garrett Serviss
In twenty generations, the initially small population of Ophiuchus IX, all colonists from India on Earth, had increased geometrically.
"Think Yourself to Death" by C.H. Thames
The Carter, or the Charioteer, with Capella Ophiuchus, or Serpentarius, or Esculapius.
"Astronomical Myths" by John F. Blake
Ophiuchus and Serpens, map of, 41. mythology of, 41.
"Astronomy with an Opera-glass" by Garrett Putman Serviss
A small new star was observed by Hind in Ophiuchus on April 28, 1848.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 648, June 2, 1888." by Various
In 1604-1605 a new star of equal brightness was seen in Ophiuchus by Kepler; it also faded out to invisibility in 1606.
"Astronomy" by David Todd
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In news:

Often the supposed 13th constellation, Ophiuchus, is also invoked as a further proof of how delusional astrologers are.
Meet Ophiuchus , new zodiac sign.
Ophiuchus , your new clothing-optional astrological sign.
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In science:

Unlike other nearby regions, such as Taurus and Ophiuchus, the HINSA component is only seen toward a small portion of the dense clouds.
The COMPLETE Survey of Star-Forming Regions: Phase I Data
Due to its low elevation, system temperatures for Ophiuchus were consistently higher than for Perseus.
The COMPLETE Survey of Star-Forming Regions: Phase I Data
Figure 13 shows average 12CO and 13CO spectra for Ophiuchus and Perseus, created by summing the spectra in all pixels where the ratio of peak antenna temperature to rms noise is greater than 3.
The COMPLETE Survey of Star-Forming Regions: Phase I Data
Fig. 13.— Average 12CO (thin lines) and 13CO (thick lines) spectra for Ophiuchus (left) and Perseus (right), created by summing the spectra in all pixels where the ratio of peak antenna temperature to rms noise is was greater than 3.
The COMPLETE Survey of Star-Forming Regions: Phase I Data
The multi-component nature of Perseus is clearly visible, whilst Ophiuchus displays a more Gaussian-like profile.
The COMPLETE Survey of Star-Forming Regions: Phase I Data
Fig. 14.— Integrated intensity image of 13CO emission in Ophiuchus, overlaid with the positions of the dense cores detected in submillimeter continuum emission (red circles; see section 2.5).
The COMPLETE Survey of Star-Forming Regions: Phase I Data
This is the main cause of the wide line-widths (∼ 15 km s−1 ) and non-Gaussian profiles exhibited by the average 12CO and 13CO spectra shown in figure 1311 , and suggests that the Perseus complex is much more dynamic than Ophiuchus.
The COMPLETE Survey of Star-Forming Regions: Phase I Data
In the case of Ophiuchus this threshold is at an AV of ∼15 mag, as indicated by the grey contour in figure 14.
The COMPLETE Survey of Star-Forming Regions: Phase I Data
Like in Ophiuchus, all of the dense submillimeter clumps in Perseus are found to lie within the larger high-extinction regions, but the threshold of ∼5–7 AV is somewhat lower than in Ophiuchus.
The COMPLETE Survey of Star-Forming Regions: Phase I Data
We have presented maps of the gas and dust in the Ophiuchus and Perseus star-forming regions, obtained using a range of different techniques, and providing information on the starforming material on scales of 0.1-10pc.
The COMPLETE Survey of Star-Forming Regions: Phase I Data
CO emission in Ophiuchus shows approximately Gaussian line shapes, while Perseus appears much more dynamic, with multiply peaked, wide, non-Gaussian lines.
The COMPLETE Survey of Star-Forming Regions: Phase I Data
In many clouds including Taurus and Ophiuchus, the length of some filaments is comparable to the full extent of the cloud.
Cold Dark Clouds: The Initial Conditions for Star Formation
Goodman et al. (1990) have produced maps of the optical polarization for Perseus, Taurus, and Ophiuchus using a combination of their own measurements with previous data.
Cold Dark Clouds: The Initial Conditions for Star Formation
In Taurus and Ophiuchus, the large scale filaments are neither completely parallel nor completely perpendicular to the global polarization pattern, suggesting that the magnetic field does not dominate the cloud structure on large scales (Goodman et al. 1990).
Cold Dark Clouds: The Initial Conditions for Star Formation
Low angular resolution NH3 observations of dense cores typically indicate gas temperatures of about 10 K with a rather narrow range of variation for clouds like Taurus, Perseus, and Ophiuchus (Myers 1983; Benson & Myers 1989; Jijina, Myers & Adams 1999).
Cold Dark Clouds: The Initial Conditions for Star Formation
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