Myrica

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Myrica deciduous aromatic shrubs or small trees
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • prop. n Myrica (Bot) A widely dispersed genus of shrubs and trees, usually with aromatic foliage. It includes the bayberry or wax myrtle, the sweet gale, and the North American sweet fern, so called.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n myrica A strongly marked genus of shrubs constituting the order Myricaceæ and characterized by staminate catkins, an ovary with one cell and one ovule, and the seed not lobed. About 35 species are known, found in temperate or warm climates, nearly throughout the world. The waxy-crusted berries of M. cerifera, which abounds in the coast-sands of the Atlantic United States, yield bayberry-tallow, formerly in considerable nse for candles, and employed as a domestic remedy for dysentery. Various other species, as M. cordifolia of South Africa, afford a useful wax. Some yield edible fruits, as M. Nagi, the yangmei of China, the sophee of East Indian mountain regions, and M. Faya of Madeira. The genus Myrica, readily recognized by the peculiar nervation of its leaves, is very abundant in the fossil state, and more than 150 fossil species have been described, found in the Cretaceous and Tertiary formations of nearly all parts of the world in which these formations are found to contain vegetable remains.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Myrica mi-rī′ka a genus of shrubs of the sweet-gale family, including the bay-berry or wax-myrtle, yielding a tallow used for candles.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L., fr. Gr. tamarisk
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. myrikē.

Usage

In literature:

This shrub is nearly allied to our native Myrica or Sweet Gale.
"Hardy Ornamental Flowering Trees and Shrubs" by A. D. Webster
Clematis verbesina, Gordonia, Erythrina, Myrica.
"Journals of Travels in Assam, Burma, Bhootan, Afghanistan and TheNeighbouring Countries" by William Griffith
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In news:

A frequent plant I encounter in abandoned farm fields is northern bayberry (Myrica pensylvanica, now Morella pensylvanica).
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