Mourning-cloak

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Mourning-cloak an undertaker's cloak, formerly worn at a funeral
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. murnan, meornan; Old High Ger. mornēn, to grieve.

Usage

In literature:

Behind it walked two gentlemen, mournfully arrayed in black cloaks and hat-bands.
"Hide and Seek" by Wilkie Collins
She pushed the heavy black cloak from over her head, and her white face appeared above the dim black shadow of her mourning.
"Romance" by Joseph Conrad and F.M. Hueffer
George Prince was there, standing against the wall, shrouded in his mourning cloak, watching the scene with alert, roving eyes.
"Brigands of the Moon" by Ray Cummings
George Prince was there, standing against the walls shrouded in his mourning cloak, watching the scene with alert, roving eyes.
"Astounding Stories of Super-Science, March 1930" by Various
Pale as death, the chief mourner, wrapped in his black cloak, is stepping into the mourning-coach.
"Ten Thousand a-Year. Volume 1." by Samuel Warren
At the funeral of "rich Spencer," 1,000 persons followed in mourning cloaks and gowns.
"Old and New London" by Walter Thornbury
Some thousand men in mourning cloaks are said to have attended his funeral.
"Milton's England" by Lucia Ames Mead
The chorus, robed in sable mourning cloaks, appeared and began the dirge for the dying God.
"On the Cross" by Wilhelmine von Hillern
This insect is called the Antiopa or Mourning Cloak; it is represented natural size in plate opposite page 145.
"Butterflies Worth Knowing" by Clarence M. Weed
In summer the cloak was exchanged for a cotton shawl, and the woollen gown for one of mourning print.
"Mind Amongst the Spindles" by Various
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