Moss-hag

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Moss-hag (Scot.) a pit or slough in a bog
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. meós; Dut. mos, Ger. moos.

Usage

In literature:

Many weary detours I made among moss-hags and screes and the stony channels of burns.
"Mr. Standfast" by John Buchan
Peat-hag, a hollow in moss left after digging peats.
"Old Mortality, Illustrated, Volume 2." by Sir Walter Scott
Peat-hag, a hollow in moss left after digging peats.
"Old Mortality, Complete, Illustrated" by Sir Walter Scott
Following the sound, he came to a moss-hag, where a group of Covenanters were worshiping God.
"Sketches of the Covenanters" by J. C. McFeeters
He was lurking in a moss-hag with his gun ready for the first red-coat or blue-jacket who should lift a hand to you.
"Patsy" by S. R. Crockett
My success in Paisley Castle has been greater than among the moss-hags.
"Graham of Claverhouse" by Ian Maclaren
We had lain sleepless and anxious all night, with watchers posted about among the moss-hags.
"The Men of the Moss-Hags" by S. R. Crockett
***

In poetry:

They durstna ride intil the bog,
That shoogit aneath their feet;
He dern'd him in a black moss hag,
For houkin' oot the peat.
"Ballad of The New Monkland Martyr" by Janet Hamilton