Margarite

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Margarite (Min) A mineral related to the micas, but low in silica and yielding brittle folia with pearly luster.
    • Margarite A pearl.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n margarite A pearl.
    • n margarite A mineral of micaceous structure, separable into thin laminæ which are rather brittle. It has a grayish or reddish color and a pearly luster on the cleavage-surface (hence called pearl-mica). In composition it is a silicate of aluminium and calcium. It is a common associate of corundum. It is one of the so-called brittle micas.
    • n margarite In lithology, an arrangement of the devitrification products (globulites) of a glassy material into forms resembling strings of beads: a term introduced by Vogelsang.
    • n margarite Same as margarita, 1.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Margarite one of the brittle micas
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. margarita, Gr. a pearl; cf. F. marguerite,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. margarita—Gr. margaritēs, a pearl.

Usage

In literature:

Alonso de Ojeda, Juan Ponce de Leon and Pedro Margarite rode with the Admiral.
"1492" by Mary Johnston
Thus Don Pedro Margarite to himself.
"Christopher Columbus, Complete" by Filson Young
In default of these, all the daughters together, Margarite and Charlotte Stiles, or their issue.
"A Short History of Women's Rights" by Eugene A. Hecker
Margarites, and other low priced beads.
"A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume VII" by Robert Kerr
The last item Patty read aloud to Harriet Gladden and Kid McCoy (christened Margarite).
"Just Patty" by Jean Webster
One was called "The Margarite of America"; another "Rosalynde.
"The English Novel in the Time of Shakespeare" by J. J. Jusserand
Cantaria Margarite Comitisse Rychemond et Derbie matris Domini Regis Henrici Septimi.
"Education in England in the Middle Ages" by Albert William Parry
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