Lunar method

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Lunar method the method of finding a ship's longitude by comparing the local time of taking (by means of a sextant or circle) a given lunar distance, with the Greenwich time corresponding to the same distance as ascertained from a nautical almanac, the difference of these times being the longitude.
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Usage

In literature:

The method which I think was then, for the first time, proposed was the now familiar one of lunar distances.
"Side-lights on Astronomy and Kindred Fields of Popular Science" by Simon Newcomb
But the method by lunar and planetary disturbances is unlike all the others in having time on its side.
"A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century" by Agnes M. (Agnes Mary) Clerke
Considerable improvements in the tables of the moon, and the promotion of the method for finding the longitude by lunar distances.
"Astronomical Discovery" by Herbert Hall Turner
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In science:

These measurements are fit using the method of least-squares to a theoretical model for the lunar motion that takes into account perturbations due to the Sun and the other planets, tidal interactions, and post-Newtonian gravitational effects.
The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment
Several observational constraints can be placed on ˙G/G using methods that include studies of the evolution of the Sun, observations of lunar occultations (including analyses of ancient eclipse data), lunar laser-ranging measurements, planetary radar-ranging measurements, and pulsar timing data.
The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment
We specifically discuss Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR), the only technique available to test the Strong Equivalence Principle (SEP) and presently the most accurate method to test for the constancy of the gravitational constant G.
35 Years of Testing Relativistic Gravity: Where do we go from here?
These measurements are fit using the method of least-squares to a theoretical model for the lunar motion that takes into account perturbations due to the Sun and the other planets, tidal interactions, and post-Newtonian gravitational effects.
The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment
Before attempting a comparison between the method of Ptolemy and that of Copernicus it is good to clarify the modern interpretation of the notions of deferent and epicycle and to clarify, also, that the motions of the Ptolemy’s lunar theories are still interpretable as motions of deferents and epicycles.
Quasi periodic motions from Hipparchus to Kolmogorov
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