Lotus

Definitions

  • A repeated and complex spiral, wheel and lotus design
    A repeated and complex spiral, wheel and lotus design
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n lotus white Egyptian lotus: water lily of Egypt to southeastern Africa; held sacred by the Egyptians
    • n lotus native to eastern Asia; widely cultivated for its large pink or white flowers
    • n Lotus annual or perennial herbs or subshrubs
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Lotus (Bot) A genus (Lotus) of leguminous plants much resembling clover.
    • Lotus (Bot) A name of several kinds of water lilies; as Nelumbium speciosum, used in religious ceremonies, anciently in Egypt, and to this day in Asia; Nelumbium luteum, the American lotus; and Nymphæa Lotus and Nymphæa cærulea, the respectively white-flowered and blue-flowered lotus of modern Egypt, which, with Nelumbium speciosum, are figured on its ancient monuments.
    • Lotus (Arch) An ornament much used in Egyptian architecture, generally asserted to have been suggested by the Egyptian water lily.
    • Lotus (Bot) The lotus of the lotuseaters, probably a tree found in Northern Africa, Sicily, Portugal, and Spain (Zizyphus Lotus), the fruit of which is mildly sweet. It was fabled by the ancients to make strangers who ate of it forget their native country, or lose all desire to return to it.
    • Lotus (Bot) The lote, or nettle tree. See Lote.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n lotus One of a number of different plants famous in mythology and tradition, or in modern times associated with traditions. Aside from the Homeric lotus (see Lotophagi and lotus-tree), the name was also given to several species of water-lily, as the blue water-lily, Castalia scutifolia (Nymphæa cærulæa), the Egyptian water-lily, C. mystica (Nymphæa Lotus), and the nelumbo (Nelumbium speciosum), the Pythagorean or sacred bean, which grow in stagnant or slowly running waters. Castalia secutifolia and C. mystica are often found figured on Egyptian buildings, columns, etc., and the nelumbo, or Hindu and Chinese lotus, bears a prominent part in mythology. In the decorative art of India the lotus-flower is used especially as a support to the figure of a divinity or of a sage or deified personage. It is so represented both in relief or solid, as in bronze, and in paintings. Similar representations in Chinese and Japanese art seem to be derived directly from India.
    • n lotus [capitalized] [NL. (Tournefort, 1700).] A genus of leguminous plants, type of the tribe Loteæ, distinguished by a two-valved pod and the pointed keel of the corolla. About 100 species have been described, which may be reduced to 50. They are found in the temperate and mountainous regions of Europe and Asia, also in Africa, America, and Australia. The plants are shrubby herbs, with peculiar quadri- to quinquefoliate leaves, of which three leaflets are near the apex of the leaf and the other two are near the base, so as to have the appearance of stipules. The flowers are red, pink, or white, and disposed in axillary umbels. The pod is oblong or often linear, and straight or curved. Many of the species are cultivated. A general name for plants of the genus is bird's,-foot trefoil. L. corniculatus is the common bird's-foot trefoil or clover of Great Britain, etc., also called cat-in-clover, fingers-and-toes, and by other fanciful names. Its herbage is highly nutritious, and it is a valuable pasture-and meadow-plant, with taller fodder-plants, or in inferior soils. Some other species are also valuable. L. Jacobæa is sometimes called St. James's flower, or jacobi.
    • n lotus In architecture, an ornament in the form of the Egyptian water-lily, Castalia mystica, frequently figured in the art of ancient nations, notably on certain types of the capitals of Egyptian columns.
    • n lotus Nelumbo Nelumbo, a native of the warmer parts of Asia and of Australia, apparently not of Egypt, though long cultivated there and often called Egyptian lotus. It is a superb plant with large, showy pink or sometimes white flowers. It is very common in cultivation, and figures extensively in Indian mythology.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Lotus lō′tus the water-lily of Egypt: a tree in North Africa, whose fruit made strangers forget their home: a genus of leguminous plants—also Lote, Lō′tos
    • ***

Quotations

  • Source Unknown
    Source Unknown
    “It's a mining town in lotus land.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. lotus, Gr. lwto`s. Cf. Lote
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr.

Usage

In literature:

This is clearly shown in that little book "The Idyll of the White Lotus," as in several of Bulwer's novels.
"The New Avatar and The Destiny of the Soul" by Jirah D. Buck
The hero was not unworthy of the praises which his peers at the Lotus dinner were glad to lavish.
"Stories of Authors, British and American" by Edwin Watts Chubb
The base of the tomb is a solid block of stone in the shape of the lotus.
"The Critic in the Orient" by George Hamlin Fitch
Mexican culture was no more Egyptian culture than a prickly-pear is a lotus.
"The Discovery of America Vol. 1 (of 2)" by John Fiske
We see the new-born child with his feet on lotuses.
"Appearances" by Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson
It had an ivory handle with the carving of a lotus bud on its end.
"A Tour of the Missions" by Augustus Hopkins Strong
Half asleep, I know the delights of the lotus-eaters' blessed isle.
"Two Years with the Natives in the Western Pacific" by Felix Speiser
Eating the fibres of lotuses.
"The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana" by Vatsyayana
Introduction a l'histoire du bouddhisme indien (Paris, 1844); Le lotus de la bonne loi (tr.
"Introduction to the History of Religions" by Crawford Howell Toy
Also a species of lotus called "Queen of the Forest," the leaves of which are used by the common people in place of tea.
"Foot-prints of Travel" by Maturin M. Ballou
Those large pink and white flowers are the flowers of the famed lotus.
"The Plant Hunters" by Mayne Reid
The attempt proved what a barrier the thorny lotus can be.
"In the Tail of the Peacock" by Isabel Savory
In the poetical language of the East the lotus is called the "goddess" as we call the rose the "queen" of flowers.
"Due West" by Maturin Murray Ballou
His was not the temperament of the lotus-eater.
"A Vanished Hand" by Sarah Doudney
I could not help feeling at times that I had eaten the lotus-leaf.
"Our Home in the Silver West" by Gordon Stables
The lotus-flower is said to lift its head above the muddy current of the Nile at the precise moment of sunrise.
"Pilgrimage from the Alps to the Tiber" by James Aitken Wylie
There are marsh fields of the white lotus.
"An Ohio Woman in the Philippines" by Emily Bronson Conger
But the lotus was never made for art, and only religion could have made it acceptable to art.
"Letters from China and Japan" by John Dewey
Meanwhile, the beautiful girl had not been drowned in the well, but had changed into a most lovely pink lotus-flower.
"Indian Fairy Tales" by Anonymous
He had almost overcome her, as though she had eaten of the lotus.
"Lady Anna" by Anthony Trollope
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In poetry:

O'er the lotus leaves and lilies,
Fell the Mother's tears of joy,
While she pressed with silent rapture,
To her heart her treasured boy.
"To The Lily of The Nile" by Lizzie E Palmer
O I'll never see my lotus lady more,
Away boys, walk away together!
Since I left her by the shore, the China shore,
Thrice again for luck and better weather!
"Yangtse River Shanty" by Hamish Maclaren
'Tis evening now, and in the glassy mere
Floats the reflected moon—a lotus flow'r—
And from some distant spire ring low and clear
The bells that chime the hour.
"Four Miles From Any Town" by David Gow
Beauty, the Gift of Gifts, I give to thee.
Pleasure and love shall spring around thy feet
As through the lake the lotuses arise
Pinkly transparent and divinely sweet.
"Song Of The Peri" by Laurence Hope
Shall I be resting from the noonday blaze,
In the rich summer of a blossoming land,
And idly glancing through the lotus leaves,
Behold the shadow of his beckoning hand?
"The Messenger" by Marietta Holley
And thou didst symbolize the deathless power
That under all decaying forms lies hid,
The old world worshipped thee, O Lotus flower,
Then carved its sphinx and reared its pyramid!
"The Egyptian Lotus (In an Artificial Pond)" by Arthur Wentworth Hamilton Eaton

In news:

Reno police were called to the duplex on Lotus Street because of a domestic disturbance.
Lotus Spa Special Laser Event.
INTERVIEWS Flying Lotus Is Captain Murphy, Drops 'Tiny Tortures' Video Starring Elijah Wood.
Flying Lotus and Captain Murphy, one and the same / Photo by Tim Saccenti.
Steven Ellison , the LA-based artist and producer otherwise known as Flying Lotus, is constantly working, the sort of guy you imagine sitting around the studio at 3 am, huddled over his MacBook.
The Lotus Dream Emporium & Spa.
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — IndyCar has released Lotus from its contract, leaving Chevrolet and Honda as the only two engine suppliers for the upcoming season.
Lotus struggled tremendously in its debut season, and was down to only one team after the Indianapolis 500.
IndyCar releases Lotus from engine supply contract.
INDIANAPOLIS—IndyCar has released Lotus from its contract, leaving Chevrolet and Honda as the only two engine suppliers for the upcoming season.
IBJ reported in July that Lotus was considering a departure from the series.
A Lotus Seven, from 1965.
Scottish racing driver Jim Clark at the wheel of his Lotus.
Proton injected some much-needed investment into Lotus.
Christina Aguilera collaborates with Blake Shelton on "Just a Fool ," from her new album "Lotus".
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In science:

We believe it is likely that a similar strategy could be used to develop an audit trail for Microsoft Excel, Corel Quattro or Lotus 1-2-3.
TellTable Spreadsheet Audit: from Technical Possibility to Operating Prototype
In November 1967, Jim Clark raced an American Indycar called a Vollstedt, which possesed small wings, and during the Tasman winter series Clark recounted the grip and stability produced by this car to one of his Lotus mechanics.
Explanation and discovery in aerodynamics
Brabham responded to the Lotus ‘wing car’ with the BT46B ‘fan car’, in which low pressure was created under the car by a rear-mounted fan driven off the gearbox.
Explanation and discovery in aerodynamics
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