Knife-tray

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Knife-tray a tray for holding knives
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. cníf: Ger. kneif, knife, kneifen, to nip.

Usage

In literature:

A new clasp-knife with a buckhorn handle lay with the loaf in the bread-tray.
"The Queen of Hearts" by Wilkie Collins
A new clasp knife, with a buckhorn handle, lay with the loaf in the bread tray.
"The Lock And Key Library" by Various
Once, head and foot had meant Aunt Cordelia above the coffee tray and Uncle Charlie below the carving-knife.
"Emmy Lou" by George Madden Martin
There was a knife left on the supper-tray.
"A harum-scarum schoolgirl" by Angela Brazil
In the pen tray lay a collection of pen-holders and pencils, a knife he had seen his father use, and a smaller knife.
"Christopher Hibbault, Roadmaker" by Marguerite Bryant
Large and small tray napkins, and knife-box cloths, are made in the same manner.
"The Ladies' Work-Table Book" by Anonymous
The man dashed his tray on the table, seized Herbert, and turned the uplifted knife downwards.
"Mrs. Halliburton's Troubles" by Mrs. Henry Wood
She held a tray upon which were a number of objects, an opal ring, a knife, and several pins.
"Clue of the Silken Ladder" by Mildred A. Wirt
There was a tray with a nice white cloth on it and some plates, and on one plate a silver knife-and-fork and some parings.
"The Little Missis" by Charlotte Skinner
Do this by quietly removing crumbs from each place with crumb-knife and tray or by brushing with folded napkin.
"Home Occupations for Boys and Girls" by Bertha Johnston
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