Kitchen-midden

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Kitchen-midden (Dan. kjökkenmödding) a prehistoric rubbish-heap in Denmark, the north of Scotland, &c
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. cicen; Ger. küche, Fr. cuisine, all from L. coquinacoquĕre, to cook.

Usage

In literature:

Ye may a' ken something o' your ain kitchen midden, but certes!
"The Moon Endureth--Tales and Fancies" by John Buchan
Why you, booby, there is the shoot of your kitchen midden, twenty feet above the roof of old Fretis' store!
"The House of the Wolf" by Stanley Weyman
Sir Banas, he comes in the night and makes them all alive at the back of our kitchen-midden,' piped the child.
"Kim" by Rudyard Kipling
Danish Peat and Kitchen-Middens.
"The Geological Evidence of The Antiquity of Man" by Charles Lyell
If you saw the kitchen midden-pits you would guess it took a long time to fill them.
"The Last Galley" by Arthur Conan Doyle
Whether they be remnants of an elevated sea-beach, or of some Indian 'kitchen-midden,' I dare not decide.
"At Last" by Charles Kingsley
Back of the trenches often lay great heaps of refuse like the kitchen middens of primeval man.
"The Hosts of the Air" by Joseph A. Altsheler
Follet lived at the ramshackle hotel, owned by the ancient Dubois and managed, from roof to kitchen-midden, by Ching Po.
"The Best Short Stories of 1921 and the Yearbook of the American Short Story" by Various
These shell-heaps, or "kitchen middens," are a feature of Fuegian scenery.
"The Land of Fire" by Mayne Reid
If you saw the kitchen midden-pits you would guess it took a long time to fill them.
"The Last of the Legions and Other Tales of Long Ago" by Arthur Conan Doyle
Lyell had studied also the Danish "kitchen-middens," familiar to those who have been carefully over the museums at Copenhagen.
"Famous Men of Science" by Sarah K. Bolton
Sir Banas, he comes in the night and makes them all alive at the back of our kitchen-midden,' piped the child.
"Kim" by Rudyard Kipling
Thus another question is raised as to who the originators of these shell heaps and kitchen-middens were.
"Alone with the Hairy Ainu" by A. H. Savage Landor
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