King-vulture

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • King-vulture a large tropical brilliantly-coloured American vulture
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. cyningcyn, a tribe, with suffix -kin; cog. with kin.

Usage

In literature:

This was what the Boers and the natives call the "king vulture," one of which goes with every flock.
"Marie" by H. Rider Haggard
The mighty vulture, however, addressing them both, said, 'Blessed be ye, I am the king of the vultures, and friend of Dasaratha!
"The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1"
Two species only seem to occur in the writings, the king vulture and the black vulture.
"Animal Figures in the Maya Codices" by Alfred M. Tozzer and Glover M. Allen
The king-vultures, without seeming to heed their presence, hopped up to the carrion, and commenced tearing it with their beaks.
"The Boy Hunters" by Captain Mayne Reid
She was usually represented as a vulture hovering over the king.
"The Evolution of the Dragon" by G. Elliot Smith
The king seemed a little uneasy, and after dinner spoke to Gorman about the Megalian Order of the Pink Vulture.
"Lady Bountiful" by George A. Birmingham
Monarch of the feathered tribes of the forest, the king vulture fears no rival throughout his wild domain.
"The Western World" by W.H.G. Kingston
This king of the vultures, as the Indians call it, had a black tail, and white plumage on its back.
"Adventures of a Young Naturalist" by Lucien Biart
He wore a head-dress of king vulture plumes, and was otherwise distinguished by his costume.
"Osceola the Seminole" by Mayne Reid
This bird which is the handsomest of its tribe is called the King of the vultures, because of the royal honours it receives from common vultures.
"Natural History in Anecdote" by Various
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In poetry:

Nathan, 'tis woeful doing
When kings are vultures amid caresses:
But when they're caresses amid the vultures
'Tis ten times worse.
"Nathan The Wise - Act I" by Gotthold Ephraim Lessing
"The time has come," the Vulture said,
"To talk of many things,
Of Accidence and Adjectives,
And names of Jewish kings,
How many notes a sackbut has,
And whether shawms have strings."
"The Vulture and the Husbandman" by Arthur Clement Hilton
Where high the tombs of royal Egypt heave,
The vulture shadows with arrested wings
The indecipherable boast of kings,
As Arab children hear their mother’s cry
And leave in mockery their toy—they leave
The skull of Pharaoh staring at the sky.
"The Dust Dethroned" by George Sterling

In news:

During that camp, he became interested in a rare vulture called the King Vulture.
Typically drifting on air currents that keep them aloft, king vultures seek carrion, filling an important ecological niche.
Like other vultures , the king vulture is a scavenger.
King vultures have a very colorful look that distinguishes them from their vulture relatives.
During that camp, he became interested in a rare vulture called the King Vulture .
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