Kickshaws

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Kickshaws A fancy dish; a tidbit; a delicacy. "Some pigeons, . . . a joint of mutton, and any pretty little tiny kickshaws .""Cressy was lost by kickshaws and soup-maigre."
    • Kickshaws Something fantastical; any trifling, trumpery thing; a toy. "Art thou good at these kickshawses !"
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Kickshaws kik′shawz something uncommon or fantastical that has no name:
    • n Kickshaws kik′shawz (cook.) a fantastical dish.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Corrupt. fr. F. quelque chose, something, fr. L. qualis, of what kind (akin to E. which,) + suffix, -guam, + causa, cause, in LL., a thing. See Which, and Cause
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Corr. of Fr. quelque chose, something.

Usage

In literature:

While they were bringing wine and kickshaws, thumps began to trot about by dozens.
"Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete." by Francois Rabelais
No cakes, no pastry kickshaws, and only wheaten bread enough for absolute necessity.
"John Halifax, Gentleman" by Dinah Maria Mulock Craik
All the pretty, tiny little kickshaws of Gotham had once been his.
"The Trimmed Lamp" by O. Henry
At sight of these kickshaws a dismal suspicion entered Mahony's mind, and refused to be dislodged.
"Australia Felix" by Henry Handel Richardson
She lives in Leeson park with a grief and kickshaws, a lady of letters.
"Ulysses" by James Joyce
I don't care for kickshaws, even if I could afford them, which has never yet been my destiny.
"Springhaven" by R. D. Blackmore
While they were bringing wine and kickshaws, thumps began to trot about by dozens.
"Gargantua and Pantagruel, Book IV." by Francois Rabelais
My wife must eat plain food, and I don't love kickshaws.
"Clarissa, Volume 5 (of 9)" by Samuel Richardson
Look what they pay for their silks and satins and kickshaws and silly furbelows!
"The Wrong Twin" by Harry Leon Wilson
I'll pay for the trees, shrubs, and kickshaws in the gardens and lawns.
"The Fat of the Land" by John Williams Streeter
He can't make what you call side dishes and French kickshaws.
"Old Gold" by George Manville Fenn
I hate your kickshaws, there's so much pawing about them.
"The King's Own" by Captain Frederick Marryat
This is rather a change from the kickshaws of France to the roast beef of old England.
"Confessions of a Book-Lover" by Maurice Francis Egan
It seems, as usual, that the difficulties thicken, not about the necessaries, but about the luxuries and kickshaws of life.
"Mystic London:" by Charles Maurice Davies
And I stole away to get th' babe some kickshaws i' th' village, that they twain might be alone together.
"A Brother To Dragons and Other Old-time Tales" by Amelie Rives
I'll make riders of you yet, or my name isn't Kickshaw.
"Tales from "Blackwood," Volume 2" by Various
None of your kickshaws and folderols!
"Hildegarde's Harvest" by Laura E. Richards
Poll was a person who rather despised sweeties and kickshaws.
"Birds and Man" by W. H. Hudson
Andover, knowing her, imagined that she had been refused some kickshaw, and thought no more about it.
"The Black Moth" by Georgette Heyer
The Coneys never had kickshaws, only a plain, substantial dinner, the best of its kind.
"Johnny Ludlow, Second Series" by Mrs. Henry Wood
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In news:

Queens Kickshaw, Melt Shop, and Little Muenster perfect the art of the gooey cheese sandwich.
Tuffy Kickshaw 's Sweetly Covered Corn.
I'm embarrassed to admit how quickly I blew through not one, but two, bags of Tuffy Kickshaw 's Sweetly Covered Corn.
The Queens Kickshaw deftly tackles two trends, bringing Astoria serious joe and fanciful grilled cheese.
Tuffy Kickshaw's Sweetly Covered Corn.
I'm embarrassed to admit how quickly I blew through not one, but two, bags of Tuffy Kickshaw's Sweetly Covered Corn.
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