Iron-clay

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Iron-clay a yellowish clay containing a large quantity of iron ore
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. iren; Ger. eisen.

Usage

In literature:

And brittle iron might as well not be iron at all; it might better be clay.
"The Iron Puddler" by James J. Davis
She stretched the chain to its length, and with a great stone drove the sharp iron stake at the other end of it, into the clay-floor.
"Sir Gibbie" by George MacDonald
The surface soil of these hills is composed chiefly of sand with varying admixtures of clay and oxide of iron.
"Andersonville, complete" by John McElroy
Water could be boiled in pots made of iron, brass, lead, or clay.
"Our Legal Heritage, 5th Ed." by S. A. Reilly
Put an iron cover on the box and lute with clay.
"Burroughs' Encyclopaedia of Astounding Facts and Useful Information, 1889" by Barkham Burroughs
They possessed gold, but were content with brass; and instead of iron they built with clay.
"Lancashire Idylls (1898)" by Marshall Mather
Arts and Crafts: Drawing Bent Iron Work Clay Modeling Basket Making Hammock Weaving, etc.
"The Boy and the Sunday School" by John L. Alexander
An iron spade, probably used in preparing the clay for brickmaking, was found in one of the kilns.
"New Discoveries at Jamestown" by John L. Cotter
It was iron, just as it had come out of the ground, with clay and earth about it.
"Chambers's Elementary Science Readers" by Various
The elements did not hold together, even as the mixture of iron and clay in the image did not cleave together.
"Our Day" by W. A. Spicer
This corps was advanced to Iron Hill, about three miles in front of White Clay creek.
"The Life of George Washington, Vol. 2 (of 5)" by John Marshall
The administration became an emblem of the image that Nebuchadnezzar saw in his dream, the leg was of iron, and the foot was of clay.
"The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. From William and Mary to George II." by Tobias Smollett
Is it iron, or sulphur, or clay, or oxygen?
"Fables of Infidelity and Facts of Faith" by Robert Patterson
The pure iron of the ore is separated by washing out the clays and soft elements, but the harder substances must be smelted by means of heat.
"Checking the Waste" by Mary Huston Gregory
Coerced she was iron, coaxed she was clay.
"Doom Castle" by Neil Munro
The terminus is a vaulted redoubt, its walls composed partly of clay, partly of sheet-iron.
"War" by Pierre Loti
In addition to skill in iron work, the Fans show considerable ingenuity in making vessels of clay.
"The World and Its People: Book VII" by Anna B. Badlam
Ochreous, consisting of fine clay, containing iron.
"A Manual of the Antiquity of Man" by J. P. MacLean
Carnal and spiritual weapons will no more unite under the gospel dispensation than iron and miry clay.
"War Inconsistent with the Religion of Jesus Christ" by David Low Dodge
The materials of the assay furnaces differ, in that one is made of bricks, another of iron, and certain ones of clay.
"De Re Metallica" by Georgius Agricola
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In poetry:

Ah, yes! Columbia, pause to hear
The note of dread;
'Twill smite like iron on the ear;--
Our Clay is dead!
"Henry Clay" by Effie Afton
Hosannah to the Prince of light,
That clothed himself in clay,
Entered the iron gates of death,
And tore the bars away.
"Hymn 76" by Isaac Watts
Some are of iron, to affront the gay,
And some of bronze, to satirize the brave,
But most are merely a compost of clay
Cut in the sleepy features of a slave.
"The Golden Corpse" by Stephen Vincent Benet
And yon gigantic idol of the North,
Whose mighty limbs of mingled iron and clay
Are trembling—tottering, soon will prostrate fall,
A crumbling mass of ruin and decay.
"Night Scene At The Fall of Sebastopol" by Janet Hamilton
Death said, I gather, and pursued his way.
Another stood by me, a shape in stone,
Sword-hacked and iron-stained, with breasts of clay,
And metal veins that sometimes fiery shone:
O Life, how naked and how hard when known!
"A Ballad Of Past Meridian" by George Meredith
They spiled along the water-course with trunks of willow-trees,
And planks of elms behind 'em and immortal oaken knees.
And when the spates of Autumn whirl the gravel-beds away
You can see their faithful fragments, iron-hard in iron clay.
"The Land" by Rudyard Kipling

In news:

The orange color means the iron received oxygen - browner clays come from the riverbed, where low-oxygen muck preserved more fossils.
Tony Clay had tears in his eyes at his watched the Iron Bowl .
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