Insect-powder

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Insect-powder a dry powder used for stupefying and killing fleas and other insects, an insecticide or insectifuge
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—L. insectum, pa.p. of insecārein, into, secāre, to cut.

Usage

In literature:

Ashes, slaked lime, or any kind of dust or powder destroy most insects which prey on the leaves of plants.
"Three Acres and Liberty" by Bolton Hall
Dash with insect powder, or lay with tobacco leaves along the edge, and re-tack.
"The Whitehouse Cookbook (1887)" by Mrs. F.L. Gillette
Carbolic powder and soot are both disagreeable to the insect.
"The Culture of Vegetables and Flowers From Seeds and Roots, 16th Edition" by Sutton and Sons
Fresh insect powder or Scotch snuff if dusted thoroughly in a dog's coat will cause fleas to leave.
"Outdoor Sports and Games" by Claude H. Miller
Next to the cathedral, the most interesting building in Sebenico is the insect-powder factory.
"The New Frontiers of Freedom from the Alps to the Ægean" by Edward Alexander Powell
Was there not insect powder?
"The Opinions of a Philosopher" by Robert Grant
I next made a fire of a box of matches, and burnt on the embers a quantity of insect powder.
"Faces and Places" by Henry William Lucy
Keating's Insect Powder will keep them away from books, but only so long as it is renewed at short intervals.
"Bookbinding, and the Care of Books" by Douglas Cockerell
By the time Pepusch had rubbed the powder from his eyes, the disgusting population of insects had vanished.
"Specimens of German Romance; Vol. II. Master Flea" by Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann
Before setting the hen she should be thoroughly dusted with insect powder to free her from lice.
"Ducks and Geese" by Harry M. Lamon
It is useless waste of time to try to exterminate with Persian insect powder, or sulphur candles.
"Guide to Hotel Housekeeping" by Mary E. Palmer
Cheap tea contains sawdust, dried and powdered hay, grass-seed, and departed but unlamented insects.
"The Myrtle Reed Cook Book" by Myrtle Reed
Take 15 cents worth of powdered borax and a small bottle of Persian Insect Powder, and mix thoroughly together.
"Clayton's Quaker Cook-Book" by H. J. Clayton
In other cases pyrethrum or tobacco powder, wood ashes, etc., have been employed against insects.
"Disease in Plants" by H. Marshall Ward
Destroy aphides and other insects by syringing with tobacco water, or by fumigating, or by dusting with tobacco powder.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 13, Slice 7" by Various
In obedience to Baedeker's advice to travellers in Spain, we carried round a tin of insect-powder.
"The Fortunate Isles" by Mary Stuart Boyd
The memorandum which mentioned insect powder, Ka-kee-ta, and cocoanut oil should be proof enough for anybody.
"The Amazing Inheritance" by Frances R. Sterrett
Insect powder (pyrethrum) will help keep out "croton bugs" and other undesirable household pests, but cleanliness will do far more.
"A Civic Biology" by George William Hunter
Under the name of "zifa powder," an insect powder has been made composed of cork and phenol.
"Cork: Its Origin and Industrial Uses" by Gilbert E. Stecher
It's better than insect powder.
"The Dogs of Boytown" by Walter A. Dyer
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