Indian corn

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Indian corn tall annual cereal grass bearing kernels on large ears: widely cultivated in America in many varieties; the principal cereal in Mexico and Central and South America since pre-Columbian times
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: When the English colonists sat down for their first Thanksgiving dinner on February 22, 1630, an Indian chief named Quadoquina offered a deerskin bag filled with freshly popped corn. Thus popcorn made its first appearance to non-native North Americans.
    • Indian corn (Bot) A cereal plant of the genus Zea Zea Mays), also simply called corn, used widely as a food; the maize, a native plant of America;☞ In modern American usage, the word corn when unmodified usually refers to yellow corn, and Indian corn refers to the variegated variety.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Indian corn maize, so called because brought from the West Indies
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. IndiaIndus (Gr. Indos), the Indus (Pers. Hind. Hind; Zend Hindu)—Sans. sindhu, a river.

Usage

In literature:

Indian corn, or maize, or Turkish wheat, is one of the finest of cereals.
"No Animal Food" by Rupert H. Wheldon
The people of the hills are poor, though their land is fertile, and produces abundance of rice and Indian corn.
"The Expedition to Borneo of H.M.S. Dido" by Henry Keppel
It consisted mainly of salt meat, rice, and roasted Indian corn.
"Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands" by Mary Seacole
The furniture consisted of some heaps of the straw or leaves of Indian corn.
"Old Jack" by W.H.G. Kingston
Land may require drainage for Indian corn, that may not require it for grass.
"Farm drainage" by Henry Flagg French
Here they came to an anchor on the 25th, and found it a fertile place, with an abundance of sheep, cattle, Indian corn, and potatoes.
"Notable Voyagers" by W.H.G. Kingston and Henry Frith
And if the Indians can raise corn and other needful supplies, why not we?
"A Little Girl in Old Quebec" by Amanda Millie Douglas
You don't have any Indian corn growing in England, I've heard.
"A Little Girl in Old Boston" by Amanda Millie Douglas
Paeans, say we, and a temple of worshipping to the creator of Indian Corn!
"Daniel Boone" by John S. C. Abbott
Roasting ears of green corn were made the foundation of a solemn Indian feast and also of a planters' frolic.
"Customs and Fashions in Old New England" by Alice Morse Earle
***

In poetry:

I would be one with the dark, dark earth:—
Follow the plough with a yokel tread.
I would be part of the Indian corn,
Walking the rows with the plumes o'erhead.
"The Traveller-Heart" by Vachel Lindsay
Long had he lived there. As a boy had started
From the stacked corn the Indian's painted face;
Heard the wolves' howl the wearying waste that parted
His father's hut from the last camping-place.
"The Station-Master Of Lone Prairie" by Francis Bret Harte
I watch the Indians dancing to help the young corn at Taos
pueblo. The old men squat in a ring
And make the song, the young women with fat bare arms, and a
few shame-faced young men, shuffle the dance.
"New Mexican Mountain" by Robinson Jeffers
Look as far as you can see, boy, look a little further son,
For that Burma girl is burning - stick a fork in, see if she's done.
Oh, that dainty dusky damsel, Indian features, proud and sweet;
Indian ink upon her fingers, Indian corns upon her feet.
"Mandalay 2" by Billy Bennett

In news:

They were three for a couple of dollars, so she bought 30 of them and decided to figure out how to make an Indian-corn wreath.
She cut a piece of foam core in a doughnut shape for the base, wrapped it with burlap and hot-glued the Indian corn to the foam.
The seeds of Indian corn , lined up in rows on their cobs, explode with every known color in fanciful combinations.
Last week, in honor of the holiday, I spent four days removing odd-colored kernels from ears of Indian corn, after which I glued them on construction paper in the shape of a turkey.
Indians win second Corn Belt Conference contest.
Get a medium sized pumpkin, a gourd that has a curved neck, five Indian corn with the husks and something red for the wattle.
American Indians made dishes from the corn and beans they grew side by side in their fields.
Halibut with Indian Rub and Corn Salsa.
NEW DELHI— Indian villagers, furious at bears strolling into their orchards to eat apples and peaches or the corn in their fields, are engaged in a vicious struggle for space with the animals, a conference on bears in New Delhi heard Tuesday.
The colors of ripe pumpkins, haystacks, and Indian corn come together for the celebration of the harvest season.
The Museum of Indian Culture holds its 32nd Annual Roasting Ears of Corn Festival in Allentown on Sunday.
***