Hyades

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Hyades (Greek mythology) 7 daughters of Atlas and half-sisters of the Pleiades; they nurtured the infant Dionysus and Zeus placed them among the stars as a reward
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n. pl Hyades (Astron) A cluster of five stars in the face of the constellation Taurus, supposed by the ancients to indicate the coming of rainy weather when they rose with the sun. "Thro' scudding drifts the rainy Hyades Vext the dim sea."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • Hyades In astronomy, a group of about seven stars, of which the principal is Aldebaran, in the head of the Bull, supposed by the ancients to indicate the approach of rainy weather when they rose with the sun. In Greek mythology the Hyades were originally nymphs who nursed the infant Bacchus, and were transformed into stars in compassion for their incessant weeping for the fate of their brother, who was torn to pieces by a wild beast. Also Hyads.
    • Hyades In entomology, a genus of lepidopterous insects.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Hyades hī′a-dēz a cluster of five stars in the constellation of the Bull, supposed by the ancients to bring rain when they rose with the sun.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. Hyades, Gr.
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. hyades, explained by the ancients as from hyein, to rain; more prob.=little pigs, hys, a pig.

Usage

In literature:

Among these pendants are the Pleiades and the Hyades.
"Curiosities of the Sky" by Garrett Serviss
East of this are the Pleiades, and the V-shaped Hyades in Taurus, or the Bull.
"Recreations in Astronomy" by Henry Warren
The Hyades also show some fine fields with low powers.
"Half-hours with the Telescope" by Richard A. Proctor
So, it appears, he has done in his "Winter Stars" as well as in "The Rainy Hyades.
"Irish Plays and Playwrights" by Cornelius Weygandt
Note two pretty pairs in the Hyades, one south of Aldebaran, the other northwest of it.
"A Field Book of the Stars" by William Tyler Olcott
The brute is the Hyades.
"Myths & Legends of our New Possessions & Protectorate" by Charles M. Skinner
Spenser's term for the Hyades, a group of seven stars in the head of the Bull.
"The Sailor's Word-Book" by William Henry Smyth
The Hyades in Taurus, of which Aldebaran is the chief, forming the eye of the Bull, attract attention.
"The Astronomy of Milton's 'Paradise Lost'" by Thomas Orchard
It is most probable that they signify the Pleiades, or perhaps alternatively the Hyades.
"The Astronomy of the Bible" by E. Walter Maunder
Note also especially the Milky Way, the Pleiades, the Hyades, and the "Belt" and "Sword" of Orion.
"Astronomy of To-day" by Cecil G. Dolmage
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In news:

Look eastward about three hours after sunset Thursday night to see a fine astronomical treat: Jupiter rising in close proximity to the moon, surrounded by two of the closest star clusters in the sky, the Pleiades and the Hyades.
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In science:

Hyades and therefore out of the range considered in the present study).
The discontinuous nature of chromospheric activity evolution
From Mama jek & Hillenbrand (2008) it is clear that the one open cluster that supports a strict monotonicity of CA time evolution (once short–time scale variations are smoothed out) in the age range between that of the Hyades and that of M 67 and the Sun, is NGC 752.
The discontinuous nature of chromospheric activity evolution
The galactic calibration has traditionally proceeded from a zero age main sequence (ZAMS) calibration of the few galactic clusters and associations containing Cepheids, with slope defined from the LMC Cepheids and zeropoint ultimately anchored to the distance to the Hyades.
The Distances of the Magellanic Clouds
With the controversy over the Pleiades parallax as measured by Hipparcos (van Leeuwen & Hansen Ruiz 1998, Pinsonneault et al. 1998, Soderblom et al 1998) it seems wisest at present to remain with a Hyades-based zeropoint.
The Distances of the Magellanic Clouds
Thus I will turn promptly to a discussion of the open clusters beyond the Hyades.
OB Associations, Open Clusters, and the Luminosity Calibration of the Nearer Stars
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