Hurter

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Hurter A bodily injury causing pain; a wound, bruise, or the like. "The pains of sickness and hurts . . . all men feel."
    • n Hurter A butting piece; a strengthening piece, esp.: Mil A piece of wood at the lower end of a platform, designed to prevent the wheels of gun carriages from injuring the parapet.
    • Hurter An injury causing pain of mind or conscience; a slight; a stain; as of sin. "But the jingling of the guinea helps the hurt that Honor feels."
    • Hurter Injury; damage; detriment; harm; mischief. "Thou dost me yet but little hurt ."
    • n Hurter One who hurts or does harm. "I shall not be a hurter , if no helper."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n hurter One who or that which hurts.
    • n hurter Milit.: A beam placed at the lower end of a platform to prevent the wheels of a gun-carriage from injuring the parapet.
    • n hurter A wooden or iron piece bolted to the top rails of a gun-carriage, either in front or in the rear (in the latter case called a counter-hurter), to check its motion.
    • n hurter In a vehicle: The shoulder of an axle, against which the hub strikes.
    • n hurter A reinforcing piece on the shoulder of an axle.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Hurter that which hurts: a beam at the lower end of a gun-platform to save the parapet: a piece of iron or wood fixed to the top-rails of a gun-carriage to check its motion: the shoulder of an axle against which the hub strikes
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. heurtoir, lit., a striker. See Hurt (v. t.)
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. hurter (Fr. heurter), to knock, to run against; prob. from the Celtic, as in W. hwrdd, a thrust, the butt of a ram, Corn. hordh, a ram.

Usage

In literature:

Hurter said with regard to charitable foundations in his history of Pope Innocent III.
"The Thirteenth" by James J. Walsh
Frederick Emmanuel Hurter was born of Protestant parents on the 19th of May, 1787, in Schaffhausen, Switzerland.
"The Catholic World. Volume III; Numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6." by E. Rameur
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