Huckle-bone

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Huckle-bone the hip-bone, or ankle-bone
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Dim. of huck, a prov. form of hook.

Usage

In literature:

At ball and huckle-bones.
"Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete." by Francois Rabelais
He tried to divert himself at huckle-bones, and lost the gold plates of his necklace one by one.
"Salammbo" by Gustave Flaubert
At ball and huckle-bones.
"Gargantua and Pantagruel, Book I." by Francois Rabelais
Of the soldiers some were cleaning their arms; some were stretched out in the bow asleep; others were playing at huckle-bones.
"The Brass Bell" by Eugène Sue
That king and steward could exercise no rivalry over each other except at tops or huckle-bones.
"The Abbatial Crosier" by Eugène Sue
Huckle bones on a level with the back.
"Herd Record of the Association of Breeders of Thorough-Bred Neat Stock" by Various
For bursting of her huckle-bone, or breaking of her chair; But greater, greater, is her grief, as, Hodge, we shall all feel!
"Gammer Gurton's Needle" by Mr. S. Mr. of Art
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