Hessian fly

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Hessian fly small fly whose larvae damage wheat and other grains
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Hessian fly (Zoöl) a small dipterous fly or midge (Cecidomyia destructor). Its larvæ live between the base of the lower leaves and the stalk of wheat, and are very destructive to young wheat; -- so called from the erroneous idea that it was brought into America by the Hessian troops, during the Revolution.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Hessian fly a dipterous insect, in its larval state attacking stems of barley, wheat, and rye
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
From Hesse, a grand-duchy of the German Empire.

Usage

In literature:

In North America, much damage is done to crops of wheat by the Hessian fly.
"The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction" by Various
The Hessian fly, the wire-worm, the flea, and grubs and scale insects thrive mischievously.
"The Long White Cloud" by William Pember Reeves
I told him that the Hessian fly attacked only the green plant, and did not exist in the dry grain.
"Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson" by Thomas Jefferson
This is the case of mine as well as yours: and the Hessian fly appears alarmingly in our growing crop.
"Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson" by Thomas Jefferson
The Hessian fly has been known to destroy as much as sixty per cent.
"Checking the Waste" by Mary Huston Gregory
Hessian fly, 72, 196.
"Our Common Insects" by Alpheus Spring Packard
The Hessian fly, introduced from Europe more than one hundred years ago, causes during certain seasons a very great loss to the wheat crop.
"Conservation Reader" by Harold W. Fairbanks
I told him that the Hessian fly attacked only the green plant, and did not exist in the dry grain.
"The Life Of Thomas Paine, Vol. I. (of II)" by Moncure Daniel Conway
Hessian fly, introduction of in the United States, 104.
"Man and Nature" by George P. Marsh
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