Herb-of-grace

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Herb-of-grace the common rue, the vervain
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. herbe—L. herba, akin to Gr. phorbē, pasture—pherbein, to feed.

Usage

In literature:

This herb of grace, let us hope, will be found in the old footprints of the war.
"Sketches and Studies" by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Thus there would be a distinct analogy between Homeric moly and English 'herb of grace.
"Custom and Myth" by Andrew Lang
Rue was called an herb of grace, because the Romanists used it on Sundays in their exorcisms.
"The Mysteries of All Nations" by James Grant
Masses of red valerian, and some of the graceful bright rose-bay willow-herb, give colour to the banks and overhang the walls.
"Devon, Its Moorlands, Streams and Coasts" by Rosalind Northcote
We speak of vervain in connection with rue, because it was the 'holy herb,' just as rue was the 'herb of grace.
"Storyology" by Benjamin Taylor
Herb of Grace, 221, 222.
"Folk-lore of Shakespeare" by Thomas Firminger Thiselton-Dyer
Thus there would be a distinct analogy between Homeric moly and English 'herb of grace.
"Custom and Myth" by Andrew Lang
We may call it herb of grace o' Sundays.
"Heriot's Choice" by Rosa Nouchette Carey
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In poetry:

In the garden she hath found
Herb of grace and fever-few;
Woundwort there doth much abound,
Heartsease too.
"The Gardener" by Katharine Tynan
Wool, rope, cloth, old pipes
Gone, warped in service;
And the one herb of tobacco,
The herb of grace, the censer weed,
Of whorled, blue, finger-traced curves.
"Common Things" by Ivor Gurney

In news:

Here, Grace Parisi folds the herbs into softened butter and grills them with a mix of corn and halibut in a foil hobo pack.
She's wowed audiences on the stage of the Herb Strauss Schoolhouse Theater many times before, and now, Jenny Smith has been kind enough to grace the pages of the Islander.
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