Hackney-coach

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Hackney-coach a coach let out for hire
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. haquenee, an ambling nag; further history unknown.

Usage

In literature:

The number of hackney coaches that ply in the streets is twelve, under the following regulated fares.
"A Description of Modern Birmingham" by Charles Pye
As soon as he believed Robin was posted, he drove by Flavia's Lodgings in an Hackney-Coach and a Woman in it.
"The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3" by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele
During his second winter in Edinburgh, Burns met with a hackney coach accident which kept him to the house for six weeks.
"The World's Greatest Books, Vol X" by Various
When all is ready, fetch a hackney coach from the stand, and call me.
"Poor Relations" by Honore de Balzac
Upon this consideration a hackney-coach was immediately called, and away he was ordered to drive directly to Jonathan's house in the Old Bailey.
"Lives Of The Most Remarkable Criminals Who have been Condemned and Executed for Murder, the Highway, Housebreaking, Street Robberies, Coining or other offences" by Arthur L. Hayward
On one occasion a friend was so careless as to leave the manuscript in a hackney coach on his way home and it was lost.
"The World's Great Men of Music" by Harriette Brower
A HACKNEY-COACH HORSE declared himself in favour of the sliding-scale, which he understood from Sir Peter Lawrie to mean the wooden pavement.
"Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. CCCXXXIX. January, 1844. Vol. LV." by Various
I vote we take a hackney coach.
"Japhet, In Search Of A Father" by Frederick Marryat
For two days you will have to take hackney coaches to go to your business.
"The Petty Troubles of Married Life, Complete" by Honore de Balzac
As she passed through the streets in an hackney-coach, disgust and horror alternately filled her mind.
"Mary" by Mary Wollstonecraft
Weare went home, collected a few things in a bag, and took a hackney coach to a given spot, where Thurtell met him with a gig.
"George Borrow and His Circle" by Clement King Shorter
My follower is in a hackney-coach at the door, sir.
"Henrietta Temple A Love Story" by Benjamin Disraeli
Fox was left with a minority which was satirically said not to have been more than enough to fill a hackney coach.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4" by Various
An ordinary hackney-coach beats it hollow.
"Recreations of Christopher North, Volume 2" by John Wilson
We then stepped into a hackney-coach which had been stationed at a little distance.
"The Uncollected Writings of Thomas de Quincey, Vol. 2" by Thomas de Quincey
I came to the opera in a hackney-coach!
"Maria Antoinette" by John S. C. (John Stevens Cabot) Abbott
His principal object must be to discover the number of the hackney coach which took them from Clapham.
"The Complete Project Gutenberg Works of Jane Austen" by Jane Austen
The hackney-coaches have been cut down into covered cars, and the "bulky" watchmen reduced to new police.
"Nuts and Nutcrackers" by Charles James Lever
He saved money, and afterwards purchased a hackney coach, which he himself drove.
"The Diary of a Resurrectionist, 1811-1812" by James Blake Bailey
Fielding got to a phase of life when he found he had either to write or get a living by driving a hackney coach.
"Christopher Crayon's Recollections The Life and Times of the late James Ewing Ritchie as told by himself" by J. Ewing Ritchie
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In news:

Eagles coach Rodney Hackney can only guess.
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