Gum-tree

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Gum-tree a name applied to various American and Australian trees
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Idioms

Up a gum tree - (AU) If you're up a gum tree, you're in trouble or a big mess.
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. gomme—L. gummi—Gr. kommi; prob. Coptic komē, gum.

Usage

In literature:

They started awake at dawn to the discordant laughter of a jackass in the gum tree above their heads.
"Captivity" by M. Leonora Eyles
Asa is the gum of a tree that grows here.
"Across India" by Oliver Optic
These little fires were made with gum taken from the pine trees.
"Stories of American Life and Adventure" by Edward Eggleston
Suppose you had a half mile of sweet gum trees.
"Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the" by Various
They get the gum from the trees, too.
"Roy Blakely, Pathfinder" by Percy Keese Fitzhugh
A ole gum tree what's holler is ther home o' ther coon.
"Ted Strong in Montana" by Edward C. Taylor
You can know of the borer's presence by the exuding gum often seen on the tree-trunk.
"Agriculture for Beginners" by Charles William Burkett
We used to apply the gums of various trees to the soles and toes to retard consumption.
"Southern Arabia" by Theodore Bent
Certain gums; particularly the sap of pine trees.
"Practical Mechanics for Boys" by J. S. Zerbe
Forests of mangrove-trees, gum-trees, tamarind-trees, sheltered us on the west, the north, and the east.
"Perils and Captivity" by Charlotte-Adélaïde [née Picard] Dard
They arrived at the station late in the afternoon, after a delightful drive through the gum-tree forest and across a small plain.
"The Land of the Kangaroo" by Thomas Wallace Knox
As they rode along, Tommy's eyes scanned the ground, which was strewn with a thick carpet of dead leaves and bark from the forest gum trees.
"Tom Gerrard 1904" by Louis Becke
I spread on the snow some boughs that I had cut from a cedar tree and laid a gum cloth upon them.
"Reminiscences of a Rebel" by Wayland Fuller Dunaway
It was the first time I had been amongst the gum-trees, which grow so freely in all the southern parts of Australia.
"A Boy's Voyage Round the World" by The Son of Samuel Smiles
A gum-tree a mile and a half high.
"The Comic Latin Grammar" by Percival Leigh
The ride soon becomes monotonous, by reason of the interminable gum trees.
"Six Letters From the Colonies" by Robert Seaton
The second twig (Sweet Gum) shows 7 years' growth and is probably a side shoot from more or less within the tree-top.
"Trees of the Northern United States" by Austin C. Apgar
The Australian gum-tree and the Chinese laurel were conspicuous among other exotic varieties.
"Aztec Land" by Maturin M. Ballou
When we wanted a nest, we found a hole in a gum tree.
"Birds Illustrated by Color Photograph [January, 1897]" by Various
Any removal of large limbs will produce gum, which is apt to end in decay, and finally in the death of the tree.
"Soil Culture" by J. H. Walden
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In poetry:

The golden pomp is come;
For now each tree does wear,
Made of her pap and gum,
Rich beads of amber here.
"To Live Merrily, And To Trust To Good Verses" by Robert Herrick
The torn leaves swirled about my head;
The gum-trees tall and stout
Waved limbs and tossed tormented crests
As in a forest rout.
"Arnold Rode Behind" by Roderic Quinn
Then hearken how the poplar trees unfold
Their buds, yet close and gummed and blind,
In airy leafage of the mind,
Rustling in silvery whispers the twin-hued scales
That fade not nor grow old.
"Song of Poplars" by Aldous Huxley
“The Forest will show me the secrets of Fame,”
I said to myself in the gum-shadowed glen,
“I will call every blossom and tree by its name,
And the people shall deem me a man of the men.
"Sunset" by Henry Kendall
The far-travelled sheep lie at rest in the bend,
And the camp fire gleams red to the sky,
The shadows creep round us, and day's at an end
And the gum trees lean down to us, friend unto friend,
As the night-winds go murmuring by.
"A Leaf From Macquarie" by William Henry Ogilvie
We said our Mass in canvas tents, and neath the gnarled trees;
Of red-gum slabs and sheets of bark we built our sanctuaries
Our axes rang on timbered slopes above the mining flat,
And church and school and convent mark the path of Father Pat.
"Vale` - Father Pat" by John O Brien

In news:

Tree replaces bedpost to stick gum.
Especially the "gum tree" on the campus of Southeast Missouri State University.
The tree, Monday's photo puzzler on the "Faces & Places" page, is not even a distant cousin of the gum tree family.
Chewing gum was originally exactly that, congealed tree gum or resin, plus a flavoring agent, also usually natural.
Chewing gum was originally exactly that, congealed tree gum or resin, plus a flavoring agent, also usually natural.
Simply put – they are gum resins made from tree sap.
The sweet gum tree creates fireworks in the garden, with star-shape leaves that change to fiery hues in fall.
The roots of a sweet gum tree push through the curb along Westwood Avenue on Monday.
See bluebirds, tupelo gum trees on GWF hikes.
Alfredo Rodriguez Arzate is a Mexican gum harvester who, like his Mayan ancestors before him, searches the forests of Chetumal for chico zapote trees.
Sweet gum trees, often called "gumball" trees, are a nuisance because each one annually drops hundreds of round, prickly seed capsules that can be easy to slip on when walking and are difficult to clean up SJ-R file.
Local media said the astonished canoeists put the animal on an embankment at a local golf club where koalas were known to live in the gum trees.
The cry of these birds, clustered in the gray gum trees that shade this dusty pit stop on the Great Northern Highway, triggers memories of a year I once spent in Fremantle, another town on the outback 's verge.
Photos by Ted Buss/Special to the Times Record News Derek Watson, of Complete Lawn Service, maneuvers a stump grinder during final stages of removing a dead sweet gum tree.
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In science:

For example, for black gum as the base species and Carolina ash as the NN species, the cell count is 26 which is 13 % of the 205 black gums (which is 28 % of all trees).
Overall and Pairwise Segregation Tests Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Observe that the percentages and Figure 9 are suggestive of segregation for all tree species, especially for Carolina ashes, water tupelos, black gums, and the “other” trees since the observed percentages of species with themselves as the NN are much larger than the row percentages.
Overall and Pairwise Segregation Tests Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Figure 9: The scatter plot of the locations of water tupelos (triangles △), black gum trees (pluses +), Carolina ashes (crosses ×), bald cypress trees (diamonds ⋄), and other trees (inverse triangles ▽).
Overall and Pairwise Segregation Tests Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Black gums and Carolina ashes are significantly segregated for t > 2 m; black gums and bald cypresses are significantly segregated for t > 2 m; black gum and other trees are significantly segregated for all the distances plotted.
Overall and Pairwise Segregation Tests Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
We will only consider the three most frequent tree species in this data set (i.e., water tupelos, black gums, and Carolina ashes).
New Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
For example, for black gum as the base species and Carolina ash as the NN species, the cell count is 31 which is 15 % of the 205 black gums (which is 36 % of all trees).
New Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
For example, for black gum as the base species and Carolina ash as the NN species, the cell count is 26 which is 13 % of the 205 black gums (which is 28 % of all trees), and 15 % of the 171 times Carolina ashes serves as NN (which is 23 % of all trees).
Class-Specific Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Observe that the percentages and Figure 3 are suggestive of segregation for all tree species, especially for Carolina ashes, water tupelos, black gums, and the “other” trees since the observed percentage of species with themselves as the NN is much larger than the marginal (row or column) percentages.
Class-Specific Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Black gums and Carolina ashes are significantly segregated for t > 2 m; black gums and bald cypresses are significantly segregated for t > 2 m; black gum and other trees are significantly segregated for all the distances plotted.
Class-Specific Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
The plot contains 13 different tree species, of which we only consider two, namely, bald cypress (Taxodium distichum ) and black gum trees (Nyssa sylvatica ).
Directional Clustering Tests Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Figure 7: Ripley’s univariate L-functions (top row) bLii (t) − t for i = 0, 1, 2, where i = 0 stands for all data combined, i = 1 for black gums, and i = 2 for bald cypresses; and pair correlation functions g (t) for all trees combined and for each species (bottom row).
Directional Clustering Tests Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Table 12: The NNCT for swamp tree data and the corresponding percentages (in parenthesis). B.G. = black gum trees, B.C. = bald cypress trees.
Directional Clustering Tests Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
The plot contains trees from 13 different tree species, of which we only consider the live trees from two species, namely, black gums and bald cypresses.
On the Use of Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables for Testing Spatial Segregation
The percentage values are also suggestive of segregation, especially for black gum trees.
On the Use of Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables for Testing Spatial Segregation
The directional (one-sided) tests indicate that black gum trees and bald cypresses are significantly segregated.
On the Use of Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables for Testing Spatial Segregation
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