Glist

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Glist glĭst Glimmer; mica.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • glist To shine; glisten.
    • glist To look.
    • n glist In mining, a shining black or brown mineral, of an iron cast, something like cockle (schorl).
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Glist glist a dark ferruginous mineral found in lodes, micaceous iron ore.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
From Glisten

Usage

In literature:

Above the Falls it bends its glist'ning ray, While in the deep its radiance is cast.
"The Song of the Exile--A Canadian Epic" by Wilfred S. Skeats
The clouds, as through the air they quickly pass, Hurry their shadows o'er the glist'ning grass.
"Translations of German Poetry in American Magazines 1741-1810" by Edward Ziegler Davis
The scars of the turf were still unhealed, and the glist of the spade was on the grass.
"The Manxman A Novel - 1895" by Hall Caine
Pale 'neath the tumbling waves that sing his name Eternally at my dew-glist'ning feet.
"Blooms of the Berry" by Madison J. Cawein
Eye the bleak heaven, and next the glist'ning earth, With looks of dumb despair.
"The Works of Alexander Pope, Volume 1" by Alexander Pope
Behold what isles these glist'ning seas adorn!
"The Lusiad" by Luís de Camões
All men of younger house which banners bear Should have their difference glist'ning large and fair.
"The Curiosities of Heraldry" by Mark Antony Lower
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In poetry:

The sun, with rising glory, sheds
A radiance, that none divine,
Save those, who early leave their beds,
When glist'ning dew-drops briefly shine.
"A Sabbath Morning In The Country" by Thomas Frederick Young
Sometimes when shoo's ventur'd to say,
"Come hooam an stop in lad, to-neet."
Awve felt shamed an awve hurried away,
For her een have been glist'nin wi weet.
"Lamentin' An Repentin'" by John Hartley
On windy meads where wave white breaks,
Where fettered briers' glist'ning hands
Reach to the cold moon's ghastly lands,
Hoots the lorn owl, and crouching quakes.
"The White Evening" by Madison Julius Cawein
My Reason for being one Week absent from her. You ask me why my throbbing breast
Heaves with a rising sigh;
You ask me why the glist'ning tear
Stands trembling in my eye:
"To ------" by Charlotte Dacre
"Aegeus sleeps, O Dionysos! sleeps
Pale 'neath the tumbling waves that sing his name
Eternally at my dew-glist'ning feet.
And so he died, O Dionysos! died!
O let me sing thy triumph ere I die!
"Dionysos" by Madison Julius Cawein
The clouds dispersed as night wore slowly on,
And stars from their high glist'ring fields looked down,
Till late the moon-top'd hills in white arose,
And peerless night unveiled her shivering realms of snows.
"The Runaway" by Albery Allson Whitman

In science:

For every ν ≥ 0, we let Glist (ν ) denote the random subgraph of G obtained by deleting the edges of G corresponding to the first ν d(v) entries in each list Lv .
Random walks on quasirandom graphs
By Corollary 7, we have that Glist ( β ρ + o(1)) ⊆ G′ ⊆ Glist ( β ρ − o(1)) with high probability.
Random walks on quasirandom graphs
It therefore suffices to study the edge distribution of Glist (ν ).
Random walks on quasirandom graphs
We will show that, on large scales, Glist (ν ) has the same edge distribution properties as a random graph of the appropriate density.
Random walks on quasirandom graphs
The probability that an edge of G is retained in Glist (ν ) is e−2ν + o(1).
Random walks on quasirandom graphs
For the edge uv to be retained in Glist (ν ), v must not appear in the first ν d(u) entries of Lu , and u must not appear in the first ν d(v) entries of Lv .
Random walks on quasirandom graphs
Let Grem denote the subgraph of G consisting of those edges which are removed from G to obtain Glist (ν ) and consider the random variable XA,B = eGrem (A, B ).
Random walks on quasirandom graphs
We will show that with probability 1 − oǫ (1) the graph G′ obtained from G by removing the edges of W is close to Glist (β /ρ).
Random walks on quasirandom graphs
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