Gin-horse

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Gin-horse a mill-horse
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Contr. from engine.

Usage

In literature:

Does your superficial gin-horse mind incline to shake its empty head over all this?
"Bunyan Characters (Second Series)" by Alexander Whyte
I had seen the horses stan'in' aboot twa or three times i' the gloamin'; an' Sandy maun be aboot ill gin he be aboot onything.
"Robert Falconer" by George MacDonald
I drove gin wagons in the time of the war in a horse-power gin.
"Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States" by Work Projects Administration
The boy was engaged in driving the horses in a cotton gin.
"The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Part 3 of 4" by American Anti-Slavery Society
The boy was engaged in driving the horses in a cotton gin.
"The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus" by American Anti-Slavery Society
The machinery of a cotton-gin is driven by steam or horse power; generally the former.
"Camp-Fire and Cotton-Field" by Thomas W. Knox
They used a horse to pull the gin.
"Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States" by Work Projects Administration
Dey sot de gin house afire, and den dey went in de lot and got all de mules and de horses and ca'y 'em wid 'em.
"Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves" by Work Projects Administration
They ran all gins and thrashers by horse power and the running gear was all made out of wood.
"Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves" by Work Projects Administration
But they were not to be out-generaled even by a general; and straight up to the gin the horses were headed.
"The Arena" by Various
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