Firk

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Firk A freak; trick; quirk.
    • v. t Firk To beat; to strike; to chastise. "I'll fer him, and firk him, and ferret him."
    • v. i Firk To fly out; to turn out; to go off. "A wench is a rare bait, with which a man""No sooner's taken but he straight firks mad.B.Jonson."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • firk To carry away or about; carry; move.
    • firk To drive away.
    • firk To beat; drub; trounce.
    • firk To rouse; raise up.
    • firk To move quickly; go off or fly out suddenly: sometimes used reflexively.
    • n firk A stroke; a lash.
    • n firk A freak; a trick.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Firk f─Śrk (Shak.) to whip or beat: to rouse.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Cf. OE. ferken, to proceed, hasten, AS. fercian, to bring, assist; perh. akin to faran, to go, E. fare,

Usage

In literature:

You firk him, I'll firk him myself; pray, Sir Paul, hold you contented.
"The Double-Dealer" by William Congreve
Adveniat; oats will do, there's evidence in the case; but none of the rubbing down, none of the firking.
"Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete." by Francois Rabelais
A wench is a rare bait, with which a man No sooner's taken, but he straight firks mad.
"The Alchemist" by Ben Jonson
Adveniat; oats will do, there's evidence in the case; but none of the rubbing down, none of the firking.
"Gargantua and Pantagruel, Book V." by Francois Rabelais
Why shoulde I goe gadding and fisgigging after firking flantado Amphibologies, wit is wit, and good will is good will.
"The Unfortunate Traveller, or The Life Of Jack Wilton" by Thomas Nash
You firk him, I'll firk him myself; pray, Sir Paul, hold you contented.
"The Comedies of William Congreve Volume 1 [of 2]" by William Congreve
No firking out at fingers ends?
"The Mad Lover" by Francis Beaumont
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