Exeunt

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Exeunt They go out, or retire from the scene; as, exeunt all except Hamlet. See 1st Exit.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n exeunt They go out: a word used in the text of plays to denote that point in the action at which two or more actors leave the stage.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Exeunt eks′ē-unt. See Exit.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L., 3d pers. pl. pres. of exire, to go out

Usage

In literature:

At the end exeunt Duke and Duchess, leaving Casilda with Marco and Giuseppe.
"The Complete Plays of Gilbert and Sullivan" by William Schwenk Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan
Exeunt soldiers L. JOHN sits down.
"If" by Lord Dunsany [Dunsany, Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, Baron]
To him, thus unconscious, enter and exeunt again a pair of voyagers.
"The Wrong Box" by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne
Exeunt French dragoons, giving up the pursuit.
"The Dynasts" by Thomas Hardy
If you speak of evil thoughts, turn to the Gospel: De corde exeunt cogitationes malae.
"The History of Don Quixote, Vol. I., Part 1." by Miguel de Cervantes
If you speak of evil thoughts, turn to the Gospel: De corde exeunt cogitationes malae.
"The History of Don Quixote, Vol. I, Complete" by Miguel de Cervantes
Exeunt also Griffith, Hunt, and Kershaw.
"The Gold Bat" by P. G. Wodehouse
Exeunt the Mother, Christine, and the Sexton.
"Master Olof" by August Strindberg
Exeunt servants, save those two who warm the newspaper, administer the muffins, and serve out the tea.
"The Newcomes" by William Makepeace Thackeray
But is it not true that, sooner or later, 'omnia exeunt in mysterium'?
"Yeast: A Problem" by Charles Kingsley
Exeunt wine-bibbers, topers, grogshop keepers, Drayton, Ben Jonson and William Shakspeare.
"Around The Tea-Table" by T. De Witt Talmage
The three put back the four, and so exeunt.
"Curiosities of Literature, Vol. II (of 3)" by Isaac Disraeli
General search as Indians exeunt right and left.
"Patriotic Plays and Pageants for Young People" by Constance D'Arcy Mackay
This was Andrews's exeunt, for I have never seen him since.
"Between the Lines" by Henry Bascom Smith
Exeunt, on one side, SMITH, PRINCESS, NANTAQUAS, NIMA, and train.
"The Indian Princess" by James Nelson Barker
Both exeunt lower right.
"Erdgeist (Earth-Spirit)" by Frank Wedekind
To him, thus unconscious, enter and exeunt again a pair of voyagers.
"The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 7 (of 25)" by Robert Louis Stevenson
Exeunt Major Worthington and Mrs. King.
"Dramatic Technique" by George Pierce Baker
Later they all rode away, and Maurice with them, leaving me to pack for our exeunt that afternoon to a little place called Water-lily Farm.
"The Claw" by Cynthia Stockley
EXEUNT OMNES (L.), all go out, or retire.
"Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary (part 4 of 4: S-Z and supplements)" by Various
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In poetry:

FIRST PRIEST.
Insulting slaves! If gentler methods fail,
The whips and angry tortures shall prevail.
'Exeunt Chaldeans'
"The Captivity" by Oliver Goldsmith
CHORUS.
Can whips or tortures hurt the mind
On God's supporting breast reclin'd?
Stand fast, and let our tyrants see
That fortitude is victory.
'Exeunt'.
"The Captivity" by Oliver Goldsmith
POLEMIUS (aside).
The world
Shall this day a dread example
Of my justice see, transcending
All recorded in time's annals. (Exeunt Polemius and Carpophorus.)
"The Purgatory Of St. Patrick - Act III" by Denis Florence MacCarthy
CHORUS OF ALL.
Arise, all potent ruler, rise,
And vindicate thy people's cause;
Till every tongue in every land Shall offer up unfeign'd applause.
'Exeunt'.
"The Captivity" by Oliver Goldsmith
Ma. Then let us meet our proud foe face to face,
And with our swords and speares that right maintaine,
Which lately we by sword and speare did gaine.
Exeunt.
"Rhodon And Iris. Act V" by Ralph Knevet
Cy. With thee I am resolv'd to spend my breath,
Indifferent in the choice of life or death.
Exeunt Ma. Cy. Po. Agnostus come forth: blacke cloud of ignorance,
Advance thy leaden pate, dull Camell.
"Rhodon And Iris. Act IV" by Ralph Knevet